Can I Get GST/HST Back on Goods I Bought in Canada and Exported?

This is a question we get asked regularly.  It is not always an easy question to answer. 

Subsection 252 (1) of the Excise Tax Act (the "GST/HST Legislation") provides that if a non-resident is the recipient of a supply of tangible personal property (i.e., goods) acquired by the person for use primarily outside Canada, the person may receive a rebate of the GST/HST if the person exports the goods within 60 days.  There are a number of caveats to this general rule:

1) the non-resident person must have evidence that they exported the good within 60 days of acquiring the good;

2) the non-resident person must have evidence that they were the recipient of the good (e.g., someone else did not buy it);

3) the non-resident person must have evidence of the amount of GST/HST paid;

4) the consideration payable for the supplies exceeds $50;

5) the non-resident person must file the correct refund application within 1 year of exporting the good;

6) the person claiming the rebate is a non-resident at the time the rebate is claimed;

6) the good must not have been consumed is Canada (e.g., rebates are not available for food, drinks, concert tickets, etc.); and

7) the good is not an excisable goods, gasoline, diesel fuel or other motive fuel (other than certain exceptions).

There are special rules that allow for the assignment of a rebate to the supplier of the goods.  We won't confuse things by getting into this scenario.

 

The Canada Revenue Agency Advises Charities About Political Activities

On August 20, 2015, the Canada Revenue Agency ("CRA") posted on its web-site an "Advisory on partisan political activities" by charities. The CRA "gently" "reminded" charities that "registered charities that they are prohibited from devoting any of their resources to partisan political activities."  However, the CRA failed to remind charities that should the CRA take the position that their resourced were allocated to partisan political activities, they might revoke their charitable status.  If the CRA revokes a charity's charitable status for income tax purposes there are many negative consequences, including GST/HST consequences.

Charities are entitled to claim certain public sector rebates of GST/HST paid on business inputs.  If charitable status is revoked, the entitlement to claim public sector rebates would be affected.

Certain supplies by charities are exempt from GST/HST.  However, if charitable status is revoked and another exemption is not applicable, the supplies may be taxable.  If the charity does not collect GST/HST on supplier that transition from exempt to taxable status, the charity may be assessed for failure to collect GST/HST.

In other words, the business model o the charity will be affected and potential GST/HST liabilities may result.

If you are a charity, please review the CRA's advisory to ensure that you do not cross the lnies that have been drawn.  The advisory states:

"Since we are in an election period, we remind registered charities that they are prohibited from devoting any of their resources to partisan political activities. A partisan political activity is one that involves the direct or indirect support of, or opposition to, any political party at any time, whether during an election period or not, or a candidate for public office.

The prohibition on partisan political activity is a long-standing requirement under the Income Tax Act. Charities are responsible for their resources, and must devote these resources to exclusively charitable purposes. Since they are well placed to study, assess, and comment on government policies that relate to their charitable programs, charities can engage in a limited amount of non-partisan political activities. However, charities that devote any resources to partisan political activities may no longer be eligible for registration. A charity’s resources include funds, property, and personnel (volunteers, employees, and directors).

Partisan political activity may include, but is not limited to:

  • providing financial or material contributions to a political party or candidate
  • making public statements (oral or written) that endorse or denounce a candidate or political party
  • criticizing or praising the performance of a candidate or political party
  • organizing an all-candidates meeting or public forum in a way that could be seen to favour a political party or candidate
  • inviting candidates to speak at different dates or different events in a way that favours a candidate or political party
  • posting signs in support of, or opposition to, a candidate or political party
  • distributing literature or voter guides that promote or oppose a candidate or political party explicitly or by implication
  • explicitly connecting its views on an issue to any political party or candidate

The restrictions on partisan political activities do not prevent volunteers, employees, or directors of charities from:

  • helping in a political campaign, as long as they do this in their personal capacity and do not suggest they represent a charity
  • making partisan political comments in public (including on social media), as long as they make it clear they are speaking in their personal capacity and not as a representative of a charity

Charities that use the Internet or social media to post information should ensure the information does not contain partisan political statements. Also, the information should not link to statements made by a third party that support or oppose a candidate or political party.

When a charity invites comments on its website, blogs, or on social media, it should monitor them for partisan political statements and remove, edit, or moderate such statements within a reasonable time.

For more information on political activities, go to Resources for charities about political activities, including Policy Statement CPS-022, Political Activities, and Partisan political activities, or call our Client Service Section at 1-800-267-2384."

Should University Students Buy New Houses? The Canada Revenue Agency Does Not Think So

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has implemented a policy to deny GST/HST new housing rebates when the claimant resells the newly built house quickly after taking possession.  Pursuant to subsection 254(2) of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) the CRA considers the following preconditions (along with other preconditions) before granting a rebate of a portion of the GST/HST paid acquiring the new home:

  • a builder of a single unit residential complex or a residential condominium unit makes a taxable supply by way of sale of the complex or unit to a particular individual,
  • at the time the particular individual becomes liable or assumes liability under an agreement of purchase and sale of the complex or unit entered into between the builder and the particular individual, the particular individual is acquiring the complex or unit for use as the primary place of residence of the particular individual or a relation of the particular individual,
  • the total (in this subsection referred to as the “total consideration”) of all amounts, each of which is the consideration payable for the supply to the particular individual of the complex or unit or for any other taxable supply to the particular individual of an interest in the complex or unit, is less than $450,000.

The CRA is denying the new property residential rebates claimed by many buyers of new homes (sometimes via the builder) on the basis that the individual did not acquire the residential complex and the individual's primary place of residence.  In other words, the CRA takes the position that if you sell a property shortly after taking possession, you never intended the property to be your primary place of residence.  In other words, the CRA takes the position that every person who takes possession and sells shortly thereafter must have purchased the new home with the intention to flip the house/condo.

When speaking with the CRA, I was informed that a client's new residential rebate was denied because he/she was a graduate student at the time that he/she signed the agreement of purchase and sale. The CRA appeals officer indicated to me that the CRA's position is that it is unreasonable for an individual (student) to enter into a commitment to purchase a home when the person does not have steady income. Even when the person is about to graduate, they should not expect to have a steady income (as they could lose their job).

I am sharing the CRA's position - but, do not agree with it.  What do you think of the CRA's position - but do not shoot the messenger.

Farmers Receive Guidance From British Columbia on New PST Regime

On March 22, 2013 (a week before the re-implementation of provincial sales tax in British Columbia), the Ministry of Finance issued PST Bulletin 101 "Farmers".  Old MacDonald has some guidance, but is it helpful enough?

The good news for farmers is that they have a bulletin.  The bad news is it is 19 pages to read, digest, synthesize and implement in one week,  The good news is that half of the pages are lists of exempt sales and taxable sales.  The bad news is that March 21 is a date many farmers start to prepare fields, orchards and farms for spring planting and start the business cycle - they do not have a lot of extra time like they did after harvest ended in Fall 2012.

As for content, PST bulletins are helpful.  PST Bulletin 101 "Farmers" does contain good lists and some thought and effort went into the preparation of the lists.  However, there is not much guidance on when the BC auditors will deny the exemption on the basis that the purchase is not "solely for farm purposes".

Not all the answers farmers require are contained in PST Bulletin 101 "Farmers".  Farmers may have to review other Bulletins, such as PST Bulletin 002 "Charging, Collecting and Remitting PST"PST Bulletin 301 "Related Services",  PST Bulletin 103 "Aquaculturists" (which is currently not released), Bulletin PST 110 "Production Equipment and Machinery Exemption" (which is currently not released), Bulletin PST 305 "Containers, Labels and Packaging Materials" (which is currently not released), and PST Bulletin 314 'Exemptions for First Nations" (which is currently not released) to name a few (not all).

Farmers may apply for an exemption card to show at the time of a purchase of exempt goods and/or services.  Farmers must apply for the exemption card using Certificate of Exemption - Farmers Form (FIN 458) (however, it is currently not released). In the meantime (and after re-implementation), farmers may use their BC Farmer Identity Card. Farmers who do not have a BC Farmer Identify Card may apply for one from the Ministry of Agriculture Council.  In light of the fact that PST re-implementation is April 1, 2013 and only one week away, it is unlikely that a farmer without a card will be able to receive one before April 1.  This is unfortunate in light of the fact that re-implementation coincides with the planting season.

That being said, the supplier is able to provide a refund of the PST paid within 180 days of the purchase if the documentation is subsequently provided.  However, retailers will need to have the ability to document refunds and expose themselves to assessments for making errors.  This is not an ideal situation for retailers.

Farmers may also seek from the BC Ministry of Finance refunds of PST paid in error or paid due to inadequate documentation to support a point of sale exemption. There will be a form (FIN 355/FAF), but it is currently not yet released.

Canadian Taxpayers Bill of Rights

Yesterdau. I wrote a post entitled "Do You Have A Complaint About The Canada Revenue Agency?" and mentioned the Taxpayers Bill of Rights.  I provided a link to the CRA web-site.  Here are the Rights:

1. You have the right to receive entitlements and to pay no more and no less than what is required by law.

2. You have the right to service in both official languages.

3. You have the right to privacy and confidentiality.

4. You have the right to a formal review and a subsequent appeal.

5. You have the right to be treated professionally, courteously, and fairly.

6. You have the right to complete, accurate, clear, and timely information.

7. You have the right, as an individual, not to pay income tax amounts in dispute before you have had an impartial review.

8. You have the right to have the law applied consistently.

9. You have the right to lodge a service complaint and to be provided with an explanation of our findings.

10. You have the right to have the costs of compliance taken into account when administering tax legislation.

11. You have the right to expect us to be accountable.

12. You have the right to relief from penalties and interest under tax legislation because of extraordinary circumstances.

13. You have the right to expect us to publish our service standards and report annually.

14. You have the right to expect us to warn you about questionable tax schemes in a timely manner.

15. You have the right to be represented by a person of your choice.

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Timmins Endorses Anti-HST Resolution

The city of Timmins is a northern Ontario city who is using its municipal voice to request an harmonized sales tax (PVAT portion) point of sale exemption on heat & hydro.  The Daily Press reports in an article entitled "City support resolution fighting HST" that the City of Timmins endorsed a resolution calling on the Ontario government to exempt items of necessity, such as gas and utilities.

It would be preferable if the cities would use proper language as they are not looking for an exemption.  The government of Ontario does not have power to amend the Excise Tax Act (Canada) to add an exemption.  Ontario does have the power to grant point of sale rebates. A point of sale rebate on a taxable good is better than an exemption because suppliers of exempt property and services are not entitled to claim input tax credits in connection with business inputs related to the exempt supply.

The resolution endorsed by Timmins was prepared by North Bay. North Bay's resolution has been forwarded to other Northern Ontario cities including Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie and Thunder Bay.

Maybe Timmins could seek Shania Twain's voice and the message will get more press.

 

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Taxpayers May Not Be Helped By Past Mistakes of CRA

I often discuss with corporate taxpayers that they have been doing things a certain way for a number of years.  Often these taxpayers were audited by the Canada Revenue Agency ("CRA") on a previous occasion and the taxpayer's way of doing things were blessed or the mistake was not highlighted.  I have discussed that the CRA is not bound to make the same mistake twice and can change its mind without giving notice to the taxpayer.

In a recent decision of Manotas v. the Queen, the Tax Court of Canada discussed this very issue in the context of a taxpayer claiming residency for the purposes of determining entitlement to the Goods and Service Tax Credit.  The words may be changed slightly to apply in goods and services tax ("GST") and harmonized sales tax ("HST") cases.  Judge Bowie wrote in the decision:

I have not overlooked that the appellant has chosen to file returns declaring her income in Canada each year, nor the fact that upon her departure the Minister expressed the view that she was a “factual resident of Canada”. It is not open to individuals to establish Canadian residence when that is economically beneficial to them by the simple expedient of filing a return of income under the Act. Nor is the Minister bound by his conclusion as to her residence formed a decade ago. Factual circumstances change, and conclusions change with them. But even where the circumstances remain unchanged, the Minister is free to form a different opinion as to the legal effect of the circumstances in a later time period. It is well settled that if the Minister arrives at an erroneous conclusion in assessing a taxpayer (or in determining the right to refundable credits), she is not bound to repeat that error in perpetuity: see Nedelcu v. The Queen [which was confirmed by the Federal Court of Appeal]

Sorry to be the messenger of this news. 

Non-Residents Can Get Their Border GST/HST Back If They Plan Ahead

I am asked regularly whether a non-resident person who does not wish to register for GST/HST purposes can get an input tax credit for the goods and services tax ("GST") and harmonized sales tax ("HST") (if charged and) paid at the border.  The answer is "no", the non-resident cannot claim an input tax credit if they do not get into the GST/HST system, post security and file GST/HST returns.

However, other options may be available depending on the facts (which can be arranged to permit recovery).  These options are available in a business transaction and are not available to a non-resident bringing goods to Canada for their own use (e.g. at a cottage in Muskoka). The two main options are:

1) use of a drop shipment certificate; and

2) structuring the importation in a way to permit another person to recover the money.

These options are not available in every situation.  They are complicated to describe and implement.  Often the assistance of a sales tax lawyer or accountant or consultant is requirement to make sure the transactions are structured perfectly.  Since the purpose of the structuring is to get money back from the Canadian government or accomplish tax relief, the Canada Revenue Agency may inquire about the facts to see if all "t"s are crossed and "i"s dotted.

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For Many Businesses In Ontario, Only The Accounting Departments Knows HST Means More Work

When harmonized sales tax ("HST") was announced to be introduced into Ontario, the McGuinty Government told everyone that the administrative burden for businesses will decrease.  Those who work in the area know the truth - there is more work now than there was before HST.

Big businesses (many of which are not really that big) have a greater administrative burden with HST record keeping and reporting because they recapture certain input tax credits and undertake the calculations very quickly or face late filing penalties. 

Builders of real property experience a greater administrative burden with HST because they must file many different forms for transitional rebates, new housing rebates and the recaptured input tax credits.  What they did not tell builders is that they will have to file separate forms for the GST portion of the rebate and the PVAT portion of the rebate.  Builders also face late filing penalties.

Same holds true for long term care home and retirement home builders who also must file multiple forms to claim the new residential rental property rebates and transitional rebates (separate forms for each for the GST portion and the PVAT portion).  I have spoken with one client who spent hours just trying to determine which forms needed to be filed out.  Some portions of some forms did not need to be completed because there were other forms to complete instead.  My client could not figure out what to do to get the much needed money back and called me.  It even took me a couple of billable hours to create the road map.  Quite frankly, the forms are a bureaucratic mess.  I should also note that after the forms are filed by builders, they are usually audited and valuations are required before the money is paid (often after a year of waiting).

Public sector bodies (municipalities, universities, schools, hospitals, charities, not-for-profits) also have to complete and file separate forms for the GST portion and the PVAT of the public sector body rebate.  In most cases, the percentage of the rebate at the federal level is different than the rate at the provincial (PVAT) level.  If the public sector body (e.g. a charity) operates in more than one province, there are separate calculations because the provincial rebate rates are not harmonized.  Some provinces do not offer all the rebates.

In addition, businesses must collect HST according to the place of supply rules.  Some of these businesses are charging HST on transactions where they did not previously collect provincial sales tax.  This may be because the sales tax base changed or it may be because the transaction involves an HST province.  Prior to HST, there may not have been a nexus between the supplier in the province and after HST the business is a tax collector of HST.

There are many other examples that I could provide.  Many involving having to spend large amounts on legal or accounting advice to make sure 13%/15%/12% mistakes are not made.  Instead of providing more examples where the administrative burden has increased, I will ask you to provide real life examples by making comments.  Please add to the discussion.

Direct Deposit of GST/HST Rebates and Refunds

If you would like the Canada Revenue Agency to make a dict deposit of a refund or a rebate into you business account, you should complete a "Direct Deposit Request" form.  The downside of filling out such a form is that it becomes easier for the CRA to garnish a bank account if the business is assessed.  They will have the bank account information in their computer records.

What Will Happen If The "Yes" Vote Wins In British Columbia?

The most important document to study will be the "hard-to-read" Comprehensive Integrated Tax Coordination Agreement between British Columbia and the Government of Canada signed in November 2009 (called the CITCA by tax geeks).  The second most important document to read is the amendment letter to the CITCA signed in March 2010.  A review of the original Memorandum of Understanding may also be helpful. There will be other relevant documents that will be made public voluntarily and through access to information requests to the Government of Canada and the Government of British Columbia.  These documents will need to be reviewed carefully to determine the best plan to move forward.

What exactly will happen will happen in response to a "Yes" vote is yet to be determined.  What we know is that many will not like the plan.  The elimination of the Harmonized Sales Tax ("HST") in British Columbia will not happened immediately on August 26, 2011 if the "Yes" (anti-HST) vote is the successful side.  People celebrating at bars and restaurants will see HST on their bills after the announcement.

Businesses will need time to adjust.  This would be fair to the businesses who are, in reality, the tax collectors from the public.  The businesses will need to know what to do and the mechanisms to collect another tax (even if it is the British Columbia social services tax) will have to be put in place.  Businesses throughout Canada and not just British Columbia will need to adjust their record-keeping systems.  As with HST implementation, a change will involve a lot more work than just changing a tax rate in the computer.

Businesses inside and outside British Columbia will also need to register to collect the replacement tax.  The government will need to launch a new education campaign to communicate the obligations on businesses.  Also with the "To Do List', the government will need its own "To Do List", which will include setting a time line, passing legislation, education of the public (and duck as the tomatoes are thrown), hire people in the Consumer Taxation Branch, train the new employees, prepare policies and bulletins, talk with the Federal Government about repayment, enforcement and other process matters, etc.

If the "Yes" vote wins, GST registrants in British Columbia will still be required to charge, collect and remit HST when they sell to an HST province.  They will still be obligated under the Excise Tax Act (Canada) and regulations thereto to file a GST/HST returns in the future.  The HST Place of Supply Rules will still apply to certain transactions.  So, HST will not be elimniated fully under any change plan.

The rules relating to claiming refunds, rebates and credits under the HST tax system will need to be clarified for B.C. businesses.  There is a possibility that there may be a deadline set for amounts a business or consumer is entitled to receive from the Government of Canada.

If the HST is going to be eliminated, businesses who are registered for GST/HST purposes and entitled to claim input tax credits will take the opportunity to purchase goods and services before the change.  Those businesses that will have to pay unrecoverable provincial sales tax after the change may decide to undertake the expenditures at a time when they can recover HST by way of an input tax credit.  Businesses will take prudent steps to save money while the change occurs. 

Consumers, on the other hand, may delay purchases until after the change occurs when they are purchasing an exempt good, real property, intangible property or services that are not subject to provincial sales tax.  This will most negatively affect the real estate market and the service sector.  There will be transition rules for the change that will need to be developed and communicated.

Consumers outside the province of British Columbia may delay purchases of goods from British Columbia until after the change (or at least after the date of the announcement of the plan for the replacement tax).  The place of supply rules may change and give rise to opportunities to save sales tax.

In the meantime, the Government of British Columbia will undoubtedly talk about repayment of the monies received from the Government of Canada to implement the HST.  There will be talk of new taxes that were not in place in British Columbia before July 1, 2010.  As sure as night follows day, if the "yes" vote is the majority, the blame game will start.

We will continue to watch and report on this developing story - if it develops into a story.  Nothing much will happen if the "No" vote is the majority.

Deregistered Charities Face GST/HST Issues

When I say "deregistered charities", I am referring to deregistration as a charity and not deregistration for GST/HST purposes.  If a charity that was a registered charity is deregistered as a charity (no longer considered to be a charity by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)), that entity will face a number of assessments, including GST/HST, if they do not make changes.

If an entity is deregistered as a charity, it would have to determine if the supplies made by it are exempt or taxable for GST/HST purposes.  Many supplies made by charities are exempt pursuant to Part V.1 of Schedule V to the Excise Tax Act (Canada).  A key pre-condition to the exemption may not be satisfied after deregistration.  If the exemption is no longer available and the entity does not change its invoicing (charging) practices, it may be assessed for failure to collect GST/HST.

If supplies become taxable (when a charity no longer makes exempt supplies), the entity must determine if they may claim input tax credits paid by it on business inputs.  The accountants and book-keepers will have to undertake a careful review.  If the entity does not claim input tax credits, it may lose its opportunity.

If an entity is deregistered as a charity, it would no longer be entitled to claim public service body rebates to recover otherwise unrecoverable GST/HST paid on business inputs.  Charities may claim a public service body rebate of 50% of the GST portion.  Depending on the province(s) in which a charity operates, the charity may claim another rebate for the PVAT (provincial) component.  If the charity is deregistered, a key pre-condition of entitlement will no longer apply.  If the entity does not change the way it completes its GST/HST return, it may be assessed to draw back rebates improperly claimed.

There are many other changes that may be experienced by specific charities.  For example, certain charities take advantage of the election in section 211 of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) and that benefit would no longer be available.  Certain volunteer reimbursements and allowance rules would not longer be available. Certain charities could deregister for GST/HST if they are below the small supplier threshold for charities. 

If the CRA is talking about deregistration of an entity as a charity, that entity needs to address the issues in that discussion.  If they ignore the CRA during the deregistration process and do not take steps to revisit all elements of charging GST/HST and taking advantage of entitlements, there may be costly assessments against the former charity and/or the directors of the charity.

What Should You Do If The Ontario Ministry of Revenue Refuses You An HST Cheque?

I was asked this question this week and there is no easy answer. 

The Ontario government promised eligible Ontario individual taxpayers (or couples) 3 HST rebate cheques  (the transition benefit) to be sent on or about June 2010, December 2010 and June 2011. If you have not received your HST cheque from the Ontario Ministry of Revenue, you should determine whether you meet the eligibility criteria.

Assuming that you meet the eligibility criteria, you should call the authorities to see if they have made an error.  The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers the Ontario Sales Tax  Transition Benefit Program and can be reached at 1-877-627-6645. 

It is possible that the CRA has set off your HST rebate against an income tax or other tax debt.  The good news is that you are still receiving the benefit, just not in the way you had hoped.  Others may find that there is a tax dispute that is outstanding or beginning.  Unfortunately, that dispute may play its course before the cheques will be sent.

Some taxpayers will learn that the CRA has determined that they are not eligible for the HST rebate cheques.  You may be given the opportunity to prove eligibility or you may be informed of the CRA's decision.  Assuming there is a refusal to issue the Ontario HST transitional rebate cheque, there are few great options.

When a government department, body or agency makes an incorrect decision or does not act in accordance with the law, the affected person may file an application for judicial review. In a  judicial review, the court looks at the decision of the government decision-maker.  The problem with a judicial review is that it takes time, is very costly and the court is deferential to the government (meaning they usually agree with the government).  The legal fees could run into the tens of thousands of dollars (will cost much more than the HST cheque amount).  You will need a lawyer to help you prepare and file the application for judicial review on time.  You may only have 30 days from the date you knew of the adverse decision to file the application for judicial review.

Another possibility is bringing a small claims court action against the government.  This option is less expensive, but also takes time and your energy.  There is a cost to filing a small claims court action.

Another possibility is filing a complaint with the Ontario Ombudsman whose job is investigating complaints against the Ontario Government.  There is no cost to filing a complaint.  The Ombudsman may or may not accept the complaint.  If the Ombudsman accepts the complaint (he would likely want others to come forward with the same problem), he will write a report.  It is unlikely that the report will be issued before the Ontario election as the Ombudsman will have to conduct his investigation and then write a report.

Another realistic possibility is calling the candidates running in your riding.  During the Ontario election campaign, incumbents and challengers should be the most interested in resolving the issue.  That being said, they may be busy campaigning and may be reluctant to get involved with a private matter. 

In addition, there is social media and the media.  Many MPPs are on Twitter.  If you start writing about your issue to a real live MPP, then you may find others who have the same problem.  You may get blocked or a visit from the police if your tweets get too threatening - so, keep to the facts and ask nicely for help.  While you may be angry at the CRA or the Ontario Government, the MPPs did not do this to you - so, do not mistreat them.  Remember the old saying "you catch more bees with honey than with vinegar".

A group has a louder voice than a single person.  Social media may bring you supporters and fellow refused persons. If hundreds or thousands are being denied the HST transition rebate for no good reason, this could get media attention.

Depending on how large the group of individuals who have been refused HST transition rebate cheques without a reasonable explanation becomes, they may bring a class action law suit - but this is another expensive option.

Please share with us whether you have been refused an HST transitional rebate.

The Canada Revenue Agency Has Released A New Guide For Non-Residents Doing Business In Canada

Non-residents who are doing business in Canada and would like to comply with Canada's Goods and services tax (GST) and harmonized sales (HST) tax laws should review this new gide published by the Canada Revenue Ageny on June 15, 2011. "Doing Business in Canada - GST/HST Information for Non-Residents" is an important document to read.  It is over 38 pages on information that may or may not answer the questions that the non--resident may have about their GTS/HST obligations.

Whether or not a non-resident is actually doing business in Canada is a factual test.  There is no definition of "carrying on business in Canada" in the GST/HST laws.  Pages 7-8 of the CRA's document address the basics and a Canadian sales tax lawyer can help apply the CRA's test in a particular case.

The CRA document addresses many issues, including:

1. Should a non-resident register for GST/HST purposes?

2. How is GST/HST calculated?

3. What are the GTS/HST return filing requirements?

4. What are the place of supply rules for charging HST?

5. How is GST/HST applied on imported goods?

6. How is GST/HST applied on imported services and intangible property?

7. How is GST/HST applied on exported goods, services and intangible property?

8. What are drop shipments and how do the drop shipment rules work?

9. How do non-residents recover GTS/HST by way of a rebate?

New Residential Housing Transitional Rebate: Look at this Case

There aren't any cases yet on the new residential real property transitional rebates that were put into effect when Ontario and British Columbia implemented harmonized sales tax (HST).  I would like to share a recent case, Kearse v. the Queen, that deals with the transitional rebate when the GST rate was reduced from 7% to 6% on July 1, 2006.  It may be helpful.

Section 254 of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) provides for a rebate of GST on a new residence bought for occupation by the purchaser or a family member where the selling price of the residential complex is less than $450,000.00.  During transitions (changes to GST/HST rates and rules), the calculation of the rebate amount is complicated.

 

Amalgamations and GST/HST

Amalgamations are the combining of one or more corporation to form a new entity.  For example, Corporation A and Corporation B can amalgamate under corporate laws to form Corporation AB.  The assets and liabilities are transferred to the newly amalgamated entity.  The question arises whether there are GST/HST consequences.

The answer is found, in part, in paragraph 271(c) of the Excise Tax Act (Canada), which provides that:

Where two or more corporations (each of which is referred to in this section as a “predecessor”) are merged or amalgamated to form one corporation (in this section referred to as the “new corporation”), ... for the purposes of this Part, the transfer of any property by a predecessor to the new corporation as a consequence of the merger or amalgamation shall be deemed not to be a supply.

The rest of the answer is overlooked by many advisors.  Paragraph 271(a) of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) provides that for some purposes the new corporation is deemed to be a separate person form each of the predecessor corporations. Paragraph 271(b) of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) provides that for the purposes of applying certain prescribed provisions, the new corporation shall be deemed to be the same corporation as, and a continuation of, each predecessor corporation. The list of prescribed provisions is contained in the Amalgamation and Winding-up Continuation (GST/HST) Regulations. The list includes

  1. Section 120
  2. Definition “builder” in subsection 123(1)
  3. Section 134
  4. Section 148
  5. Section 148.1
  6. Subsection 149(1)
  7. Section 150
  8. Section 156
  9. Section 160
  10. Section 166
  11. Section 181.1
  12. Section 182
  13. Subsections 183(2) and (4) to (8)
  14. Subsections 184(2) to (7)
  15. Subsection 186(1)
  16. Section 194
  17. Section 219
  18. Section 222
  19. Subsection 223(2)
  20. Section 224
  21. Section 225
  22. Section 227
  23. Section 228
  24. Section 229
  25. Section 230
  26. Section 230.1
  27. Section 232
  28. Section 233
  29. Section 237
  30. Section 238
  31. Section 261
  32. Section 263
  33. Section 263.1
  34. Section 264
  35. Section 265
  36. Section 266
  37. Section 273
  38. Section 274
  39. Divisions VIII and IX of PART IX

Two additional provisions that are affected by an amalgamation are sections 231 and 249 of the Excise Tax Act.

It is beyond the scope of this short blog article to address each of these provisions in detail. I would like to highlight that the past GST/HST liabilities (and entitlements) continue in the new corporation.  for this reason, it is important to undertake due diligence of GST/HST accounts before agreeing to an amalgamation because the new corporation may end up saddled with old GST/HST debts and the new directors may ultimately be assessed if the GST/HST debts cannot be recovered from the new corporation.

There is another important issue that is overlooked - registration numbers.  Often, the advisors forget to notify the government authorities (including the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) for GST/HST purposes) about the amalgamation and continue with one of the registration numbers of a predecessor corporation.  This is wrong.  Technically, the the new corporation needs to obtain a new GST/HST registration number.  It is possible to ask the CRA if one of the GST/HST numbers of a predecessor entity may be continued and the other registration numbers canceled.

An amalgamation is an event for GST/HST purposes that has consequences.  For more information, please contact Cyndee Todgham Cherniak at 316-760-8999.

A GST/HST Joint Venture Election Allows One Co-Venturer To Account For GST/HST

Section 273 of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) authorizes one participant in certain types of joint venture (called the "operator") to account for GST/HST on her behalf and on behalf of the other co-venturers.  For example, if A (25%), B (25%), C (25%) & D (25%) enter into a joint venture, they can appoint A as the operator and A charges, collects, and remits GST/HST and files GST/HST returns on behalf of the joint venture. A also claims input tax credits, refunds, rebates and other GST/HST relief in respect of the activities of the joint venture (to the extent permitted). If the joint venture election is not in place, A, B, C, and D would each have to charge, collect and remit 25% of the GST/HST, take 25% of the input tax credits and other relief, and file separate GST/HST returns.

The bad news is that not all joint ventures are entitled to take advantage of this election option.  Only oil and gas exploration joint ventures and prescribed joint ventures can benefit at this time.  That being said, the list of prescribed joint ventures was recently amended (after 20 years) and the Department of Finance is willing to consider making additions in the future.  The list of prescribed joint ventures is set out in the Joint Venture GST/HST Regulations:

  • the construction of real property, including feasibility studies, design work, development activities and the tendering of bids, where undertaken in furtherance of a joint venture for the construction of real property;
  • the exercise of the rights or privileges, or the performance of the duties or obligations, of ownership of an interest in real property, including related construction or development activities, the purpose of which is to derive revenue from the property by way of sale, lease, licence or similar arrangement;
  • the marketing by the operator of a joint venture, under any agreement between the operator and a co-venturer, of all or part of the co-venturer’s share of the output of the joint venture provided that the output arises from an activity conducted under the agreement referred to in subsection 273(1) of the Act;
  • the transportation of natural gas liquids by means of a pipeline that operates as a common carrier of natural gas liquids;
  • the operation of a facility that is used to generate electricity;
  • the operation of a transmission line that is used to transmit electrical power;
  • the processing of output (in this paragraph referred to as the “refinement”) that arises from the exploration or exploitation of a timber resource, including any jointly conducted exploration or exploitation activity of which the output is processed under the agreement referred to in subsection 273(1) of the Act in respect of the refinement and the marketing of the processed or unprocessed output that arises from that activity;
  • the production of a fertilizer and its marketing;
  • the disposal of waste, including the collection and transportation of waste that is in furtherance of that disposal;
  • the exercise of rights or privileges, or the performance of duties or obligations, of ownership of an interest in an animal for the purposes of deriving revenue from prizewinning, stud service fees or sale;
  • the maintenance of a road, other than maintenance that is an exempt supply;
  • the operation and maintenance of the North Warning System;
  • the operation of a farming business within the meaning of the Income Tax Act;
  • the production of liquid methanol from natural gas;
  • the generation and recording of seismic data; and
  • the operation of a lumber, plywood, shake and shingle, pulp, paper or similar wood processing facility.

With respect to commercial real estate, there are certain restrictions in the activities that are prescribed above.

There are a number of rules that must be followed.  Some of the most important (but not all the rules) are:

1. There MUST be a written joint venture agreement;

2. The co-venturers MUST complete the joint venture election forms (GST Form 21 and GST Form 355); and

3. The parties to the joint venture are jointly and severally liable for all GST/HST obligations of the joint venture.

The structuring of joint ventures can be complicated and meeting the requirements of the Canada Revenue Agency requires strategic planning.  There are great benefits, but also pitfalls.

People Are Careful When Writing A Confession, Why So Little Care When Completing A HST Voluntary Disclosure Form?

I honestly do not know the answer to this question.  I am baffled when a client comes to me after they have completed and sent to the Canada Revenue Agency ("CRA") their voluntary disclosure form in which they admit to a mistake in their harmonized sales tax (HST) compliance. They have already confessed their errors.  Then, when they see the HST assessment, the do not agree with the number and have a list of reasons.

I have been asked on many occasions to help correct the CRA auditor's misunderstanding of the facts - the same facts provided by the client in writing to the CRA in the voluntary disclosure form.  I cannot count the number of times a client has said to me "I did not mean to write that", "I should have been more careful in what I wrote", "I did not verify that information and it is in fact wrong", "I did not think about that", and "I just wrote something quickly".  I am asked to "fix this" ---  and, I have my work cut out for me.

Voluntary disclosures are similar to a "confession", albeit a voluntary disclosure is not often relaying criminal activities.  However, it is possible that a person will write information in a voluntary disclosure that could be used in a criminal investigation under the Excise Tax Act.  If you would seek the help of a lawyer when writing a confession, then seek the help of a lawyer when completing a voluntary disclosure form.  If you would take time to investigate facts and write, edit, review, redraft and reconsider the writing of a confession, then take time when completing a voluntary disclosure form. If you would take time to understand the consequences of writing a confession, then take time to understand the consequences of completing a voluntary disclosure.  If you would not want to cause a misunderstanding when writing a confession, then avoid misunderstandings when completing a voluntary disclosure form.

If you do not understand the law, you may miss opportunities to raise good facts that may be used to your benefit --- your actions have not all been bad have they?  You may not convey the important information and facts that support defences (such as the due diligence defence).  You may miss opportunities to support lower penalties.  You may miss opportunities to limit interest if there has been an officially induced error. 

Did you know that the CRA audits to "net tax" or do you even know what I mean by that?  You may be able to identify amounts that the CRA owes you and when you calculate "net tax" for the period in which you owe GST/HST, you may be able to subtract amounts you can show the government owes you.  There is a lot more to consider than "getting things off your chest".

Now that I have said my piece - here is the voluntary disclosure form.  The CRA calls this form "VOLUNTARY DISCLOSURES PROGRAM (VDP): TAXPAYER AGREEMENT", do not let the name fool you or cause you to be complacent.

 

Categories of Ontario Retail Sales Tax Assessments

There are good assessments (being nil assessments) and bad assessments (you own money to the Ministry).  This blog post is going to list the most common types of Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) assessments.  It is not a complete list of every type, but I will hit the highlights:

1. Assessment of a vendor who has collected ORST and failed to remit the ORST;

2. Assessment of a vendor a penalty for failure to collect ORST from a purchaser as required (including innocent mistakes);

3. Assessment of a purchaser who did not pay ORST to a vendor as required (even when the vendor did not ask for the ORST or honestly thought the sale was exempt);

4. Assessment of a director for the ORST liability of the corporation;

5. Assessment of a person who imports taxable goods into Ontario;

6. Assessment of a person who hires a non-resident contractor (who has not coordinated with Ontario) who builds real property in Ontario and imports building materials; 

7. Assessment of a person who over claimed a rebate or refund;

8. Assessment of a buyer of a business to which the bulk sales tax applies in circumstances where the vendor owes Ontario ORST on past activities and the buyer did not get a clearance certificate; and

9. Assessment of an assignee, liquidator, administrator, receiver, receiver-manager, secured or unsecured creditor, agent of the creditor, trustee or other like persons who distribute property or proceeds from the sale without obtaining a clearance certificate from the province and there are outstanding ORST liabilities.

Another categorization of assessments that you should be aware of are:

A) interim assessment - meaning that the auditor has guessed the amount and not finished his/her work before issuing an assessment;

B) audit summary: this is not an assessment; 

C) final assessment: this is an assessment if it is in the form of a notice of assessment; and

D) revised assessment: if an auditor issues an assessment and subsequently revises the assessment, the new assessment generally replaces the previous assessment (if it relates to the same transactions) and restarts the limitation period for filing a notice of objection.

Non-Residents ask "How Do I Get the GST/HST Back on Goods Purchased in Canada?"

Non-residents businesses may be entitled to recover GST/HST paid on goods delivered in Canada if the goods are exported within 60 days and if they file the paperwork for a refund/rebate. Generally speaking, non-resident consumers are not able to recover GST/HST paid on goods purchased in Canada. Canada does not have a VAT rebate for visitors who purchase goods.

Non-resident businesses who purchase goods in Canada and arrange for delivery in Canada would complete the general refund application form GST189 to claim a refund.  The rebate ismailed to the Canada Revenue Agency and not handed to the supplier for immediate benefit.

If the non-resident business or consumer allowed the supplier to arrange for shipping of the goods so that the delivery of the goods occurs outside Canada, GST/HST would not be charged.  If goods are delivered in Canada, the supplier must charge the GST/HST because the supplier can no longer control whether the goods actually leave Canada.  I had a case once where the CRA officer said to me 'How do I know that your client did not stop while driving to the United States at a few spots to resell the goods within Canada?'  The reality was, it would be difficult to prove the officer was wrong.

So here are a few examples:

If a non-resident individual comes to Canada and buys clothes and takes delivery at the store, he/she would pay GST/HST to the store and would not recover the GST/HST by way of a rebate.  If that same individual arranges for the store to ship the goods outside Canada, then GST/HST would not be payable.

If a non-resident business purchases clothes from a Canadian manufacturer to be delivered in Canada, exports the goods so that they can be resold outside Canada, the business would pay GST/HST to the Canadian manufacturer and file a rebate claim so long as the goods were exported within 60 days. If the non-resident business purchases clothes from a Canadian manufacturer to be delivered outside Canada (the manufacturer arranges the shipping), the non-resident should not pay GST/HST to the Canadian manufacturer as the transaction is zero-rated.  The non-resident saves the cash flow costs by paying for the manufacturer to ship the goods.

If a non-resident person purchases a classic car at an auction in Canada for the purposes of reselling the car at a later point in time (an adventure or concern in the nature of trade), he/she may claim a refund/rebate if the car is delivered in Canada and GST/HST is paid to the vendor of the car.  If the non-resident purchases classic car to be delivered outside Canada (the supplier arranges the shipping), the non-resident should not pay GST/HST to the Canadian supplier as the transaction is zero-rated. 

If a non-resident takes possession of goods in Canada and plans to export goods and file for a rebate, they must prove that they exported with goods within 60 days.  That means they need paperwork that has been stamped by government authorities relating to the export.  It used to be that the non-resident would present themselves and the goods to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) at the time of export and complete paperwork.  The CBSA says to non-residents that they do not have forms to complete relating to exports (even though there is the E15 Certificate of Destruction/Exportation).  I recommend that the non-resident prepares paperwork and ask the CBSA to stamp the paperwork to acknowledge the request (at least). More importantly, the non-resident should complete the entry paperwork when returning to their home country.  In the United States, the person would complete a form 7901.  This paperwork is good evidence of an import into another country, which usually is accepted as evidence of export from Canada. 

It may take weeks or months to receive the refund/rebate cheque in the mail.  There is an interesting case of a non-resident purchasing a plane and hitting a bird on take-off and having to complete repairs before export.  It took longer than 60 days to repair the plane, the 60 day deadline was missed and the rebate claim was denied by the Canada Revenue Agency and the Tax Court of Canada.

OECD Seeks Comments on "OECD International VAT/GST Guidelines: Draft Guidelines on Neutrality"

In December 2010, the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) released for comment a document entitled "OECD International VAT/GST Guidelines: Draft Guidelines on Neutrality".  The deadline for filing comments is March 22, 2011.

Canada is a member of the OECD.  Canada imposes the goods and services tax (GST) and harmonized sales tax (HST), which are value-added taxes.  As a result, the OECD guideline may be incorporated into Canadian law in the future.  As a result, it will be important for Canadian businesses who operate multi-nationally and may be affected by the guideline to prepare thoughtful comments.

This document succinctly summarizes some of the important principles behind GST/HST style taxes and, therefore, may be VERY useful to litigants in explaining why an auditor's approach is incorrect.  I have considered its usefulness in the context of may GST/HST disputes. 

For example, proposed guideline No. 1 is "The burden of value added taxes themselves should not lie on taxable businesses except where explicitly provided for in legislation."  This is a basic principle and I can hear you saying "YES".  I can hear you saying "Why did the auditor assess me as a supplier when I am engaged in a taxable business?"

Read this document!

Would You Like the HST Map to Right?

Of course you would.  The "HST Map" to getting to "Right" is exactly what you want.  What should you do to get the right result every time?  What should you do to collect the right amount of HST every time you make a supply?  What should you do to calculate the right amount of input tax credits and recaptured input tax credits every time you file a GST/HST return?  What should you do to recover the maximum amount of credits, refunds & rebates allowed?  What should you do so that the Canada Revenue Agency says you are in the "Right" place when they complete any audit?

Unfortunately, these maps do not exist on supermarket shelves - but they can be generated or customized on a business-by-business basis by commodity tax lawyers and accountants.  Where "Right" is for you depends upon the facts and where you want to go.  Just as there are many cities and towns with the same name, there are many different "Right" destinations on an HST map.  If you do not know where is "Right", how are you going to determine the path to take to get there? How can you be sure you are taking the correct route to "Right"?  If you follow the directions someone else uses to get to "Right" you may be at the wrong "Right".

Once you can identify the destination of "Right", then a customized map can show you how to get there.  The customized map will set out the process that you must follow to get to your chosen "Right" destination.  The directions are a critical part of the map to "Right".

The HST map may take the form of a memorandum or opinion letter.  Sometimes the process involves seeking additional directions, which would be in the form of an advance GST/HST ruling from the Canada Revenue Agency.

It is possible to hire a commodity tax lawyer or accountant to prepare a customized HST map if you would like to get to "Right" and stay there.  These maps do exist - believe it or not.  Would you like one?

I should add one closing note that the Department of Finance may move "Right" on you when you are not looking.  Just like with the television show "Lost", you may find that you are no longer where you thought you were/should be.  Maybe the producers were thinking about the tax authorities when they came up with the plot for "Lost" --- hmmmm

Send Documents to the CRA Using a Traceable Method

When you send a GST/HST return, file a refund application or file a notice of objection or appeal, you need evidence for two reasons:

1) To prove that you completed the document; and

2) To prove that you sent the document on or before a statutory deadline or the date requested by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

You may be the unlucky person whose document is lost by Canada Post or the courier during transit or by the CRA after delivery.

First, you should determine if you must use a specific method of transmission of the document.  The requirement of a specific method of transmission would be in the applicable provisions of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) and/or applicable regulations.  Sometimes there is a specific method of transmission (e.g., by first class mail, by registered mail, etc.) required in the statutory provision and, in these circumstances, you must do as told. 

Second, you should make sure you know about any statutory limitation periods (that is, the deadline for filing the document).

Taxpayers are often asked to send documents to the CRA auditor or appeals officer during the course of an audit. There are no rules applicable to the method of sending these documents. Often the CRA give a deadline for sending the documents to the auditor and the auditor may finalize an assessment if the documents requested as not delivered on time.

In all cases where you must send documents to the CRA, you should pick a method that gives you proof of transmission.  For example, when you send a document by registered mail, you can ask for a "return receipt", which is a document from Canada Post showing proof of delivery by Canada Post to the CRA. Also, you will have also received a document showing proof of delivery to Canada Post of the envelop to be sent by registered mail and both the envelop and the receipt are date stamped.  This is really good proof that you delivered the document to be sent on a particular day.

I have experienced situations where Canada Post's rules cause a document that I wish to send to the CRA to be rejected (e.g., envelop is too big or that the document weighs too much).  In these cases, if the Excise Tax Act or regulations requires that I send the document by registered mail, I send a letter and partial document by registered mail and send the entire document by courier.  I note in the letter to be sent by registered mail that I have attempted to follow the requirement to send the document by registered mail as required by the statute and that Canada Post has rejected the document.  I indicate the letter is being sent in accordance with the requirement and that I am sending the complete document by courier.  I give the courier tracking number in the letter.  This demonstrates that the courier package was sent prior to the letter, which was sent within the rules.  I maintain evidence of both documents that I have sent on or before the statutory deadline.

The recent case of Liao v. The Queen is a good example as to why evidence is important.  In this case, a taxpayer sent a GST refund application by regular mail.  When the taxpayer followed up with the CRA, the taxpayer learned that they had not received the refund application and the taxpayer sent another copy of the refund application.  The second copy was sent after the limitation period had expired and the CRA rejected the application as out-of-time.  The Tax Court of Canada accepted that the taxpayer had sent the first copy and that first copy was sent within the statutory limitation period.  The taxpayer was lucky that the Tax Court of Canada accepted the testimony.  The relevant deeming provisions in the Excise Tax Act indicate that anything sent by first class mail is deemed to have been received by the CRA on the day it was mailed.  Ordinary mail is considered to be first class mail.  A deeming rule causes something to be accepted as a true fact even if it may not be accurate.

In the end, evidence is key.  Liao would have been in a stronger position if it could be proved that the refund was sent on the first occasion.  Likely, the CRA would have accepted that the refund application was lost and the case would not have made it to the Tax Court of Canada.  Liao would have been saved from the stress and the cost of an appeal if it had verifiable evidence of the first transmission within the limitation period.

The last tip that I would like to give you is that you should scan your proof on transmission because it is easier to find it in your computer records when needed. Also keep the originals in a safe place.  I like to use purple coloured file folders for all important documents in a file.

What Can I Do To Motivate You To Make Positive Steps Towards Better GST/HST Compliance

I would like to offer you words of encouragement to make positive improvements towards better goods and services tax (GST), harmonized sales tax (HST) and other sales and local taxes (SALT) compliance.  I would like to motivate you to make your working lives easier if you are blessed with the task of GST/HST/SALT recording and reporting.

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) motivates us to act by fear of negative events, such as an audit and/or assessment.  The CRA motivates compliance by threat of penalties and interest assessments.  They are not wrong in approaching GST/HST in this manner as it is a self-reporting system --- follow the rules of suffer negative consequences.  Many businesses are motivated by money and fear and this system works for some. However, it does not work for many. 

Almost all businesses have just completed the task of filing a GST/HST return.  Annual filers filed their first GST/HST by today's deadline.  Quarterly filers have filed their second GST/HST return (for Q4 2010) by today's deadline.  Monthly filers filed their December 2010 GST/HST return by today's deadline. 

How many of you have spent hours of frustration in performing the calculations and rechecking documentation and numbers in order to file the GST/HST return?  How many of you could not verify whether you were to remit GST at 5% or HST at 13% or 12% or 15%?  How many of you had to self-assess GST/HST and were unsure what to do?  How many of you needed to complete documentation for a refund/rebate and were not sure what to do?  How many of you could not trace your point of sale rebates, your exempt sales and your zero-rated sales (sales when you did not charge GST/HST)?  How many of you walked away from the task wanting to scream at assistants and others within your organization?  How many called someone in your organization and "idiot" or other unpleasant name (if you did, go apologize).

Would you like this task to be easier for the next reporting period?  Are there answers you need in order to perform the task better next month or quarter or year? Is there training that you or your employees need? Would you like to take better control over this reporting process?

If you want to make the tasks related to GST/HST reporting easier, you can. Take the negative experience and make a list of why it was a negative experience to file your GST/HST return.  Write down what worked and what did not.  GST/HST compliance will improve if you fix the things you listed as not working properly. 

Did you have difficulties making sure you claimed 100% of you input tax credits? Fix it.

Did you have difficulties making sure you recaptured input tax credits where required? Fix it. 

Did you have difficulty reconciling various reports? Fix it. 

Were you lacking information that you needed to make decisions? Fix it.

Do you need help to fix it? Find people who understand GST/HST to help you. They do exist.

You can do this.  You can improve your job. You can spend more time with family and friends during GST/HST reporting time. You can be the force of positive change and others will be grateful. what are you waiting for --- another SALT return?

If GST/HST Registrant Buys Real Property, The Registrant Should Not Pay GST/HST to Vendor

I was recently called by a person who purchased a hotel property from a vendor.  The buyer paid GST/HST to the vendor.  The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has denied the input tax credit on the basis that GST/HST was not payable and, therefore, the GST/HST was paid in error.  The CRA has said that since the error was not discovered until after 2 years after the payment, they will not give a refund of tax paid in error.  This real property is used in commercial activities and the Government of Canada gets its GST/HST on accommodations, food sales, etc.

Here is the starting point of the analysis - Subsection 221(1) of the Excise Tax Act provides that every person who makes a taxable supply in Canada must collect GST/HST payable by the recipient in respect of the supply. BUT, paragraph 221(2) of the Excise Tax Act sets out important relief:

"A supplier (other than a prescribed supplier) who makes a taxable supply of real property by way of sale is not required to collect tax under Division II payable by the recipient in respect of the supply where ...  (b) the recipient is registered [for GST/HST purposes] and, in the case of a recipient who is an individual, the property is neither a residential complex nor supplied as a cemetery plot or place of burial, entombment or deposit of human remains or ashes."

What means that the supplier is not required to collect GST/HST when the buyer is registered for GST/HST purposes and purchases certain real property.

This blog post to is intended to help buyers not get themselves into the same mess.

The problem faced by this person should be fixed.  Since solutions are unique, you will have to continue to read The HST Blog to learn how.  When I hear of unfairness like this, I am inspired to help.

If You Are Assessed Customs Duties, Remember to Claim ITCs For Assessed GST

I see a lot of determinations by the Canada Border Services Agency (let's just call them assessments) relating to Harmonized System (H.S.) tariff classifications and valuations relating to imported goods.  When the CBSA decides you used the wrong H.S. tariff classification number and, therefore, the applicable duty rate is actually higher than the duty rate used at the time of importation, the CBSA assesses GST on the new customs duty included value for duty.  Similarly, if the CBSA disagrees with the valuation method that you used such that the value for duty was too low, the CBSA will assess GST on the new customs duty included value for duty. This often means that the GST portion of the assessment is equal to or greater than the customs assessment.

In many cases, importers do not realize that they are paying GST (instead of customs duties).  Some do not review the details.  Some just pay the bill of a customs broker without even receiving the CBSA documentation. In some cases, the documentation goes to the purchasing department and never gets to the person in charge of GST.

I have seen many cases where the importer of record does not claim input tax credits (ITCs) to recover the GST paid to the CBSA in respect of the imported goods.  If the importer of record in a business, they may be entitled to claim ITCs. If the goods are imported by a consumer, they are not entitled to recover the additional GST/HST paid to the CBSA.

Anyone who has been assessed by the CBSA in the past few years should determine whether they have claimed their ITCs.  I would be happy to help you determine what you are entitled to claim as an ITC.

Did You Know That McGuinty Changed The Tax Status of Fire Trucks With HST Implementation

On July 1, 2010, fire trucks became subject to HST in Ontario.  Previously fire trucks were not subject to Ontario retail sales tax (ORST).  Paragraph 7(1)23 of the Retail Sales Tax Act (Ontario) exempted "fire fighting vehicles, as defined by the Minister, when purchased at a price of more than $1000 per vehicle for the exclusive use of a municipality, university, public hospital, local services board or volunteer group, and repairs for such vehicles."  As a result, the tax rate increased by 8%.

Many of the bodies that purchase fire trucks are engaged in exempt activities.  This means that they do not recover the 8% HST/PVAT by way of an input tax credit.  many of the bodies that purchase fire trucks are entitled to a partial MUSH sector rebate.  However, none get 100% of the HST/PVAT back.  This means fire trucks are more expensive due to unrecoverable HST.

With provincial/municipal/university/hospital and other budgets so constrained, I sincerely hope that McGuinty's decision to collect more tax on fire trucks does not cost any Ontarian their life.

By the way, I disagree with McGuinty's decision to impose HST on fire trucks.  I support our hard working fire men & women who bravely put their lives on the line for us.  Let me know if you agree with me and let McGuinty know that you disagree with his decision.

Should Companies/Partners Undertake GST/HST Inspections Before Buying a Business?

Most people hire a home inspector to inspect a home before buying a home.  They hire home inspectors to find the problems that they cannot see so that they do not experience large unexpected expenditures after the closing date.

Should businesses (corporations and partners/joint venturers) hire a GST/HST expert to conduct a GST/HST focused review prior to the closing date so that they do not buy GST/HST problems that a Canada Revenue Agency auditor may blame on the buyer?  What I am referring to is due diligence and a private audit of GST/HST books and records.

A GST/HST inspection is prudent if the buyer is buying the shares of a corporation.  The past errors (liabilities) are acquired in a share purchase transaction.  If you find a serious problem with the GST/HST compliance, then a purchase price reduction can be discussed.  The purchase price reduction for the shares may be quantified by way of a pre-closing voluntary disclosure - but that may delay the transaction.  If you do not want to delay the closing of the transaction, an amount of the purchase price may be put in a reserve or escrow account as the voluntary disclosure proceeds.  It is not necessary to conduct a a voluntary disclosure and reserves can be maintained depending what is found in and quantified during the GST/HST inspection.

Similarly, a GST/HST inspection is prudent if the buyer is purchasing a partnership unit or joint venture interest in an existing partnership or joint venture. As discussed with corporations, the buyer would be buying the GST/HST history and the existing problems.

Even if the acquisition is an asset transaction, a GST/HST inspection is prudent.  If the buyer is making offers of employment to existing employees, they will continue to make any mistakes they had been making in their record keeping and reportings. If you would like to stop bad practices, you need to know they exist and take positive steps to teach proper practices.

GST/HST inspections are not usual - yet.  With the implementation of GST/HST in Ontario and British Columbia, the cost of mistakes increased to 13% and 12% respectively, plus additional basis points for interest and penalties.  Depending on the value of the business that is being acquired, there is more money at stake than the cost of replacing a leaky roof or old furnace.

Would you like to find MONEY in your Business?

If you would like to find money in your business, you should conduct an internal compliance verification.  You should undertake a review of your internal controls to ensure that you are recovering every cent of GST/HST that you are entitled to recover under the law. I would be surprised if you do not find something you have missed.  Treat the internal review as a treasure hunt with the same determination as a child with a treasure map, you may just find money.

Your review of your internal controls should also look for your failures to charge GST/HST appropriately and your failures to remit GST/HST collected and/or GST/HST that you must self-assess and remit from your own bank account.  It goes without saying that the same holds true for other sales taxes. This is finding money too and, it is a method to save money as the interest and penalties will cost you if a Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) auditor comes to visit, conducts an audit and finds your mistakes.

I have a list of places in the books and records of a business where I look for additional amounts that have been missed by a business owner and his/her staff or bookkeeper or accountant. I will not give that list out to anyone - but I use my list that has been created from years of experience (often from helping clients through audits and assessments). 

I will share one tip today. 

Since the implementation of HST, have you taken your purchase invoices and checked to see if you have claimed all of the input tax credits (ITCs) that you can to recover GST/HST paid to your suppliers?  This is a good time to take a good sample of those invoices and check to see if the GST/HST has been recorded properly and whether your internal record keeping is working to permit full recovery.  

First, do you have all the invoices?  Are you missing some of the invoices that you remember paying?   Do you remember a good of a service that was acquired and there isn't an invoice in your sample?  If an invoice is missing, you may not have recorded the input tax credit.  Do you have methods to record GST/HST paid when there wasn't a typical invoice (e.g. pursuant to an agreement of purchase and sale or a commercial lease or a license, etc.). Do you record the GST/HST amount included in each check that yo write?  What about bank drafts, wire transfer and other forms of payment?

When you are look at your invoices, check again whether the suppliers properly invoiced you GST/HST?  Do the invoices issued between May 1, 2010 and June 30, 2010 properly record GST/HST charged during the transition period?  Does the invoice reflect the correct amount of GST/HST?  This is also a great time to analyze whether the invoices (and any other evidence relating to payments of GST/HST) meet the documentary requirements of the Excise Tax Act and regulations - inadequate documentation is the top audit issue and reason why CRA auditors reject ITC claims and issue assessments.  Have you ever inquired what information is necessary (and should be maintained) to satisfy the CRA of your entitledment to claim an input tax credit?

Second, have you recorded the amounts of input tax credits in your records? If so, are there any errors? If not, how can you claim the correct amount of an input tax credit if the amounts are not recorded?  Even if they are recorded in your books and records, have you checked to see that the process actually works so that when you press the button for a calculation, that number is correct?

If your business does not claim full input tax credits, do you claim the correct amount of rebates/refunds of GST/HST (e.g. you are engaged in exempt activities in whole or in part)?  The same two steps discussed above can be used to verify that your internal controls record the GST/HST that you are entitled to claim by way of rebate/refund.

If you find previously unrecovered GST/HST, you may be able to amend your GST/HST return for the period (depending on the reporting period in which the error occurred).   You may be able to claim the input tax credit/rebate/refund on your next GST/HST return.  You may be able to file a refund claim. I cannot tell you how you get your hands on that found money without knowing the facts.

You may undertake an internal review by yourself or you may call in a professional to maximize your recovery - you do not know what you do not know and what you have missed  A small number of lawyers and accountants who understand the GST/HST laws and administrative policies may be called to assist you with this internal controls review process.  Most sales tax lawyers and accountants charge an hourly rate for their services.  There are also sales tax consultants who conduct these types of reviews and they sometimes charge you a percentage of what they find (you split the found money).

Since I am a lawyer, I have to mention that the benefit of using a lawyer is that analysis and report is subject to solicitor-client privilege and cannot be obtained by the CRA unless that privilege has been breached.  Everything you say to a lawyer about your lack of attention to internal controls and mistakes cannot be divulged to the CRA or tax authorities.  A lawyer's files should not be obtained by the CRA if they arrive with a warrant or seizure request.  If the CRA does attempt to seize a lawyer's records, the records/files may be placed under seal and reviewed by a court before the CRA can review them (which allows the lawyer to claim privilege and a judge to decide if the claim is appropriate on a document-by-document basis).

Finally, if you conduct periodic compliance verifications of your internal controls, you may have a due diligence defence if at some future point in time you are audited.  If your review process captures most of your mistakes and you miss one or two items, that can be expected. However, if you miss a lot of your errors, there would be the same question by the auditor as to whether you took care in implementing your GST/HST systems.

Good luck searching for money.  Please let us know if you find any.

Have You Received Your HST Transition Support Payment for Small Businesses?

The HST Blog asks you to comment on whether you have received your HST Small Business Transition Support cheque.  The Ontario government has advertised in HST Tax Tip #7 that small and medium sized businesses (sales less than $2 Million in the tax year 2009) that they will be receiving an HST transition support payment up to $1000 in "the fall of 2010".  Well, the leaves are colourful and it is officially fall of 2010 - where are those government cheques?

The entitlement criteria are:

•not be a listed financial institution under the Excise Tax Act (Canada);
•carry on business in Ontario and have been a GST/HST registrant on July 1, 2010;
•make GST/HST taxable supplies (including zero-rated supplies) in the course of carrying on business;
•have a premises in Ontario where it conducts its business; and
•have taxable revenue of less than $2 million in a 12-month period. 

I have spoken with  number of small businesses and no one I have spoken to has received a cheque.  Please comment on whether you are still waiting for your government cheque.  This is our way of helping keep the government accountable.

Communication of Zero-Rating, HST Point of Sale Rebates and HST on Sales Receipts is Problematic

Retailers are having difficulty communicating information to consumers on a single invoice.  Both large and small retailers are having to communicate a single blended HST charge and, at the same time, communicate when goods are zero-rated (HST is charged at 0%), exempt (no HST) and when they are offering an HST point of sale rebate (charging GST at 5%). 

The retailers have to segregate the information for consumers on the single piece of paper they provide at the time of sale (the sales receipt).  As a result, different lines of information may be shown on a sales receipt that may be confusing.  To a consumer that does not bring along a calculator, it may appear that the retailer is charging 13% + 5% tax or undercharged the 13% HST (in Ontario).

The more important problem is for the small retailers who may not be charging the HST correctly and may not be communicating the information correctly.  The smaller retailers may not have realized the extent of the systems changes that were required to implement HST.

Small retailers should know that some of the large retailers have been struggling with this issue --- you are not alone. However, both are expected to get it right.  Auditors will visit small retailers too.

MUSH Sector Rebates

This Post is out-of-date

A registrant/non-registrant for GST/HST purposes which makes exempt supplies will not be entitled to claim input tax credits (unless the entity also makes taxable supplies). Some entities are not entitled to claim any rebates of the GST/HST paid on business inputs.  The MUSH sector may or may not be entitled to claim a rebate depending on the province in which the entity is located.

I have promised to share my MUSH sector rebate chart.

MUSH Sector Entities GST Portion  Rebate HST Portion Rebate - Ontario HST Portion Rebate - BC HST Portion Rebate - NS HST Portion Rebate - NB HST Portion Rebate - Nfld
Municipalities 100% 78% 75% 57.14% 57.14% No rebate
Hospitals 83% 87% 58% 83% No rebate No rebate
School Authorities 68% 93% 87% 68% No rebate No rebate
Universities & Colleges 67% 78% 75% 67% No rebate No rebate
Charities 50% 82% 57% 50% 50% 50%
Qualifying Not-for-Profits 50% 82% 57% 50% 50% 50%

This chart highlights many important problems for the MUSH sector. 

1. The lack of significant rebates for hospitals in British Columbia, Newfoundland/Labrador and New Brunswick will put a strain on provincial budgets due to the unrecoverable health care costs.

2. The lack of significant rebates for school authorities and universities and colleges in Newfoundland/Labrador and New Brunswick will put a strain on provincial budgets due to the unrecoverable education costs.

3. Nova Scotia was able to relieve some of its budget pressures when it signed a CITCA.

4. For Ontario, the effective unrecoverable GST/HST rates (what the entity will not be able to recover by way of a rebate) in respect of purchases for use in exempt activities are:

MUSH Sector Entity Effective GST/HST Rate after Rebate
Municipalities 1.76%
Hospitals 1.89%
School Authorities 2.16%
Universities and Colleges 3.41%
Charities 3.94%
Qualifying Not-For-Profits 3.94%

4. For British Columbia, the effective unrecoverable GST/HST rates (what the entity will not be able to recover by way of a rebate) in respect of purchases for use in exempt activities are:

MUSH Sector Entity Effective GST/HST Rate after Rebate
Municipalities 1.75%
Hospitals 3.79%
School Authorities 2.51%
Universities and Colleges 3.40%
Charities 5.51%
Qualifying Not-For-Profits 5.51%

 

Prescribed Interest Rates for GST/HST

I was recently asked what is the difference between the rates of interest (1) payable by a tax debtor to Canada for GST/HST and (2) payable by the Government of Canada to a taxpayer when an incorrectly assessed amount of GST/HST is refunded.  There is a difference.

Period  Refund Interest Payable By Canada Arrears and Instalment Interest
2010    
July 1 - September 30

1% Corporate taxpayers

3% non-corporate taxpayers

5%
April 1 - June 30 3% 5%
January 1 - March 31 3% 5%
2009   5%
October 1 - December 31 3% 5%

The prescribed rate of interest on refunds and amounts owed to corporate taxpayers recently changed.  The Auditor General raised concerns in her Spring 2009 report about interest paid by Canada to corporations regarding overpayments.  Simply put, the interest rate payable by Canada to corporations on overpayments of tax was higher than bank interest rates and was costing the Government of Canada.

From the perspective of the taxpayer, the CRA should not be incentivized to make incorrect assessments, force payment and hold on to the taxpayer's money.  The change creates a disincentive to the CRA to settle tax disputes.

Will ORST Refunds Be Another TFSA Miscommunication?

Many businesses may be entitled to a refund of Ontario retails tax (ORST) paid in respect of goods and/or "taxable services" paid for before July 1, 2010 where the goods and/or "taxable services" are provided after July 1, 2010. 

The best examples I can give are annual subscriptions/licenses of computer software and leases of goods (however, there are other situations).  Please review your invoices to see if you paid an annual or other periodic amount of ORST before July 1, 2010 and set aside those invoices that relate, in part, to the period after July 1, 2010.

As a matter of law, it may be that the Canada Revenue Agency expects to receive harmonized sales tax (HST) for the portion o the supply that occurs after July 1, 2010. The HST transition rules may require an allocation between the pre-HST period and the post-HST period.  It also may be that as a matter of law, you were required to pay ORST on the full invoice at the time it was paid and things changed. You may entitled to receive a refund of ORST paid pre-HST in respect of the post-HST period.  I know that this may sound silly, but tax changes sometimes have silly effects/results.

I have reviewed the Canada Revenue Agency web-site for some guidance on this issue and have found nothing (so far).  I have also reviewed the Ontario Ministry of Revenue web-site for some guidance on this issue and have found nothing (so far).  It is for this reason that I am saying that the HST may be a source of confusion, like tax free savings accounts.  It would be helpful for businesses to be told clearly what is expected of them.

I will give an example in order to clarify: 

For example, some businesses and MUSH sector entities may an annual license for computer software in May 2010 and paid Ontario retail sales tax in addition to GST and the lump sum annual lease price.  In this example, computer software was licensed for a year for $120,000 and GST would have been $6000 and ORST would have been $9600. However, the ORST portion would be in respect of software that could be used post HST and, therefore, the purchaser must pay HST is respect of the period after June 30, 2010.  10 of 12 months would be subject to HST instead of ORST.  As a result, the purchaser would have to self-assess and remit HST on $100,000 = $8,000.  The business would be entitled to a refund of ORST from the Ministry of Revenue in the amount of $8000.

The self-assessment would occur on the GST/HST return for the first reporting period after July 1, 2010.  There is a line on the GST/HST return for self-assessed GST/HST.

The refund application would not be filed with the CRA, but, rather would be filed with the Ontario Ministry of Revenue. Here is the general refund application form - it is difficult to find on the Ontario Ministry of Revenue web-site.

This may sound silly - robbing Peter in order to pay Peter (and Paul). Some businesses for some purchases may pay both HST and ORST and will have to wait to get the ORST back.  These same businesses have audit risk under both the ORST and HST tax regimes.  The business has paid the correct amount of tax initially and then has a problem and can be assessed for failing to ensuring the tax was paid to the right person. 

You will not be able to say that ultimately Ontario received its money because technically under the HST regime, the HST goes into a pot of money and that money is allocated according to formulas, which are not based on the place of supply.  The formulas do not allow for a matching of HST to a particular province.

In a more perfect tax system, there would be a joint CRA and Ontario Ministry of Finance form that would allow a business to identify payments of ORST in the pre-HST period that cover the post-HST period.  In a more perfect tax system, the governments would ask for a copy of the invoice and make the corrections for you.  In a more perfect tax system the governments would waive interest and penalties when there is not intention to underpay sales taxes.  It should be easy for businesses to comply with sales tax laws, but sometimes it is not simple or easy.

Many Government Purchasing Departments Are Reopening Contracts and Seeking Price Reductions

This past week, I have seen a dozen or so requests made by municipal and Ontario government departments writing to their suppliers and seeking price reductions relating to existing contracts on the basis that savings related to embedded Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) must be passed on to the buyer (government department).  Most of the requests that I have seen suggest that the basis for the request is contained in the harmonized sales tax (HST) laws.

The truth is that the HST laws do not require that suppliers reopen contacts for renegotiation and pass on any savings to the purchasing government department.  The question is whether there is a provision in the contract that requires that any savings relating to tax reform be passed on to the purchasing government department.  So far, I have not seen any contract containing such a provision --- but, some may exist.

The practical reality is that if a supplier to a government purchaser does not make adjustments or open the kimono so to speak and engage in a discussion), then the government purchasing department may not renew a contract or may treat the supplier negatively in the future in a procurement situation.  As a result, even though the contract does not require price adjustments, suppliers may choose to make adjustments in order to keep the customer happy.

I will give you an example that may seem odd to a sales tax lawyer/accountant without full facts.  In one matter, a client provided a photocopier and toner to the government purchaser.  The cost of the photocopier was already a sunk cost.  However, the purchasing government department said they expected a price reduction because the supplier bought toner and the ORST cost of the toner was within the contract pricing.  As a result of HST, the supplier would no longer pay ORST on the toner and would recover the HST on the toner by way of an input tax credit.  The government department wanted a price adjustment to remove the ORST on the toner that would have been considered by the supplier in its initial pricing under the contract. The small price adjustment made sense to keep the purchasing manager happy.

With three of the matters I reviewed this week, due to the nature of the contract, there was no ORST savings to pass on to the government department.  That being said, the purchasing manager needed to be convinced and the client needed to provide detailed information about its pricing in order to prove to the purchasing manager that this was the case.  The dilemma was that in proving that there was no ORST cost embedded in the pricing, the government department needed to be provided with information that could be used in the future to negotiate price reductions.  in other words, the supplier needed to show too much of its internal information and supplier information.

Two clients priced their contract years ago so that some aspects of the contract were loss leaders and some aspects of the contract resulted in a profit.  The contracts as a whole resulted in a profit to the supplier.  In this exercise, the purchasing government department attempted to reduce the profit margins on the profitable aspects of the contract in order to achieve overall savings (to the detriment of the suppliers' bottom lines).

In all cases, the purchasing manager made it clear that he/she expected price adjustments and would communicate internally if no price adjustments were made.  Pressure was exerted and suppliers to the government were discouraged from maintaining the status quo and not "throwing the government a bone".

One reason for the pressure on the government side is that the Ontario government will start to pay HST on goods and services that were not subject to GST and/or ORST in the past.  Municipal governments do not receive all of the Ontario HST component back by way of a rebate (previously and under HST, 100% of the GST payable was refundable).

I would be pleased to discuss these issue that I am seeing with anyone in this situation.

New Canada Revenue Agency Guides Help With New Housing Rebate Calculations

The Toronto Post-G20 Clean Up and HST

As many businesses in Ontario know, there was damage in downtown Toronto that resulted from the actions of a few protesters during the week-end of July 26-27.  Here are a few tips about the pre- and post- harmonized sales tax (HST) world.

  • If a window is purchased in the pre-HST period at a retailer of glass, then goods and services tax (GST) and Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) will apply.
  • If a window is purchased on an installed basis during the pre-HST period, GST will apply, but ORST will not apply.  ORST will be incorporated into the cost of the installed window as it will be a cost of the supplier of the installed window.
  • If a window is purchased pre-HST or installed pre-HST, then the ORST cost (whether paid to the retailer or indirectly to the installer), the ORST is not recoverable.
  • If the window is purchased or installed post-HST (on or after July 1, 2010), then GST and HST would apply.
  • If a clean-up crew is hired to remove painted slogans in the pre-HST period, GST would apply, but ORST will not apply.
  • If a clean-up crew is hired to remove painted slogans in the post-HST period, GST and HST will  apply.
  • If the retailer is a store and engaged in commercial activities, they would be entitled to claim a full input tax credit to recover any GST/HST.
  • If the business is a bank, it is unlikely that the bank may claim an input tax credit and recover GST/HST paid to repair the damage.
  • If an insurance company enters into the contract with the window installer, it is unlikely that the insurance company will be entitled to recover the GST/HST because the sale of insurance policies is an exempt financial service. [Note: have the business buy the window and claim the in input tax credit]
  • If the Ontario provincial police buy a new car pre-HST, GST may not apply if the OPP are on the list of Ontario government departments (the federal government cannot charge tax of the provincial government).
  • If the Ontario provincial police buy a new police car post-HST, they must pay GST and HST.  The current rules do not provide rebates for provincial government departments.
  • If the Toronto police buy a new car pre-HST, they must pay GST and ORST, but would get a 100% rebate of the GST portion (not the ORST portion).
  • If the Toronto police buy a new car post-HST, they must pay GST and HST and will be entitled to claim the municipal PSB rebate to recover a large portion (not all) of the GST/HST paid.

I do not intend to suggest that businesses should wait. I am merely highlighting the different results caused by the tax reform.

Are Ontario Aboriginal Peoples Closer to a Point of Sale Exemption?

In Question Period in the Ontario Legislature on May 31, 2010 (I was in attendance), a liberal MPP threw a soft-ball question to a colleague about the harmonized sales tax (HST) point of sale rebate for aboriginal peoples of Ontario. The Minister responded that on May 27, 2010 (not sure this is the correct date), a Memorandum of Understanding was signed by the McGuinty Government and certain aboriginal peoples.

The answer provided during Question Period suggested that Ontario was waiting for a response from Ottawa.  However, one must look at the Comprehensive Integrated Tax Coordination Agreement (CITCA) to see that Ontario is responsible for point of sale rebates/exemptions. In other words, the McGuinty Government has the right under the CITCA Agreement to say that they want certain point of sale rebates (presumably for tax policy reasons).

Here are the provisions in the CITCA relating to point of sale rebates:

Annex “B”

Provincial Flexibility in respect of Rebates

    Definitions

  1. Unless otherwise defined in this Annex, terms used in this Annex have the same meaning as in the Agreement to which this Annex is attached. For the purposes of this Annex, the following terms have the following meanings:

    “GST Base” in respect of the Province for a calendar year means the estimated tax base under the harmonized sales taxes for the Province in the calendar year, as determined by Finance (Canada) pursuant to Formula D of Annex “A” (referred to in that Annex as “PROVBASEt”).

    “PVAT-POS Rebate”, in respect of a province, and in relation to a taxable supply of property or a service made in the province, means the provincial rebate under an Act of the Legislature of the province paid to, or credited at the time of supply in favour of, the recipient of the taxable supply, the amount of which the supplier is permitted to deduct in computing the supplier’s net tax under Part IX of the Excise Tax Act.

  2. Provincial Point-of-Sale Rebates

  3. The Parties agree that a supply of property or a service may be eligible for a PVAT-POS Rebate in respect of the Province if:
    • (a)   subject to the reasonable capacity of the Minister of National Revenue to administer and enforce such a PVAT-POS Rebate and subject to the reasonable capacity of businesses to comply with such a PVAT-POS Rebate, the definition of the property or service is used in the Canadian System of National Accounts and sufficient data is available from that system to determine the amount of expenditure in the Province attributable to the supply of that property or service; or
    • (b)    other data sources, definitions and methodologies mutually agreed upon between the Parties can be used to determine the amount of expenditure in the Province attributable to the supply of that property or service.
  4. Where the Province advises Canada of its desire to designate particular property or services as items eligible for a PVAT-POS Rebate in respect of the Province effective on and from a particular day, the Parties agree that the Province will be permitted to designate those property and services as such items if the total value, as determined by Finance (Canada) in consultation with the Province, of all such items that would be eligible for a PVAT-POS Rebate in respect of the Province immediately after the particular day (including the particular property or services) and that were supplied in the Province during the last calendar year for which the GST Base in respect of the Province has been determined, in accordance with Annex “A”, does not exceed 5% of that GST Base.
  5. If a condition under clause 2 in respect of data or definitions is not met, any cost involved in obtaining or establishing such data or definitions for the purpose of achieving the mutual agreement of the Parties referred to in that clause will be the sole responsibility of the Province. If obtaining or establishing such data or definitions benefits the Province and another participating province, the Province may enter into a separate agreement with the other participating province in respect of sharing, between the Province and the other participating province, the cost involved in obtaining or establishing such data or definitions.
  6. On and from the Implementation Date, subject to the definitions mutually agreed upon between the Parties, the Parties agree that in general terms the items eligible for a PVAT-POS Rebate in respect of the Province will be, unless such items are removed in accordance with the Agreement:
    • (a)   books;
    • (b)   children’s clothing and footwear;
    • (c)   children’s diapers;
    • (d)   children’s car seats and car booster seats;
    • (e)   feminine hygiene products;
    • (f)   printed newspapers;
    • (g)   prepared food and beverages sold for a total consideration of $4 or less; and
    • (h)   other property or service proposed from time to time by the Province that may, in accordance with the Agreement, become property or service eligible for a PVAT-POS Rebate in respect of the Province.
  7. Unless otherwise mutually agreed upon between the Parties, where an item that the Province proposes to be eligible for a PVAT-POS Rebate in respect of the Province is of the same class or kind as an existing item that is subject to an existing PVAT-POS Rebate in respect of another province, the Province agrees that the proposed item will have the same definition as the existing definition in respect of the existing item.

****

If under the Indian Act (Canada) and signed treaties with aboriginal peoples in Ontario, aboriginal peoples do not pay sales taxes (and other forms of taxes), then the point of sale rebate should not be factored into the 5% threshold.

This should be a non-issue for Ontario.  If the point of sale rebate is not granted for aboriginal off-reserve purchases (to be used on the reserve), then it would be McGuinty's lack of commitment to this point of sale exemption.

Are Ontario aboriginal peoples closer to a point of sale rebate - yes and no.

HST Means No More ORST Purchase Exemption Certificates

I received the following question today:

I am a furniture manufacturer who works with interior designers.  When I invoice, if an item is being re-sold by the designer then I do not invoice the Ontario retail sales tax (ORST).  The designer will invoice ORST directly to the client. How will this change with the HST?  Will my clients be exempt if they are re-selling an item?   Also, when I purchase materials for manufacture many items such as wood, screws glue etc are PST exempt when I purchase them and get added into the cost once sold to the customer?  How will the HST deal with this?

The answer is that the furniture manufacturer will be required to charge HST when he/she sells to the interior designer.  The interior designer is no longer entitled to provide an ORST purchase exemption certificate to be exempted from payment of sales tax.  The interior designer will pay the GST/HST and claim an input tax credit (if he/she is registered for GST/HST purposes.  The interior designer will charge the final consumer GST/HST.

In addition, the furniture manufacturer will no longer purchase his/her inputs using an ORST purchase exemption certificate.  In other words, the furniture manufacturer must pay GST/HST on all materials and components used in the manufacture of the furniture.  The furniture manufacturer would be entitled to claim an input tax credit if he/she is registered for GST/HST purposes.

This will result in cost flow issues for both the manufacturer and the interior designer (the two businesses in the example).  The businesses will have to fund the GST/HST portion when paying invoices and will be able to claim input tax credits (and offset GST/HST collected) on their GST/HST returns for the period during which the supply occurred.  I am told that some businesses may need to increase their lines of credit in order to fund the HST component that was previously ORST exempt by virtue of the purchase exemption certificate.

To be clear, on July 1, 2010, purchase exemption certificates will be invalid for purchases after July 1, 2010.  The days of the sales tax relief will over gone for good.  The Canada Revenue Agency auditors will be auditing the entire supply chain to make sure that GST/HST was paid at each step in the supply chain.

June Transactions May Limit Unrecoverable Sales Taxes

June 2010 may see an increase in last minute reorganizations by MUSH sector entities wishing to minimize unrecoverable harmonized sales tax (HST).  Here is a real life example with numbers. 

Example: A hospital needs to undertake a reorganization in order to remove unrecoverable HST in the current structure (the corporate structure has employees in one entity and that entity provides the services of the employees of that entity to other separate legal entities in the corporate structure, which results in GST being payable on the inter-company payments).

Let's say that the inter-company services of workers fees is $1,000,000 per year.  For the annual period July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010, the GST payment would have been $50,000 and the hospital authority would have recovered 87% (or $43,500) by way of a MUSH sector rebate.  The unrecoverable GST would have been $6,500.

For the period July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011, the same $1,000,000 inter-company fee for services would result in $50,000 in GST and $80,000 in HST (Ontario).  The MUSH sector rebate would be $43,500 of the GST portion and $66,400 of the HST portion (for Ontario) (and in BC it would be $70,000 in HST and a MUSH sector rebate of $40,600).  As a result, the unrecoverable combined GST/HST would be $20,100 (6,500 + $13,600).

The additional $13,600 will add up over time.  As a result, a reorganization is necessary based on this HST analysis and other considerations. 

When should the reorganization occur?  Let's assume that the fair market value of the assets involved in the reorganization is $10,000,000.  If the transaction is completed before July 1, 2010, the hospital entities in the structure would save $136,000 in unrecoverable HST.  Since the structure involves a number of charities, the unrecoverable HST is actually higher because the MUSH sector rebate for charities is 82%.  If you do the math, it makes sense to complete reorganizations before July 1, 2010.

As a result, it would be prudent for MUSH sector entities (which cannot recover GST/HST by way of input tax credits) to consider whether they should reorganize their structure in order not to "bleed" money after HST.  MUSH sector entities need all the money in their cash flow.

Ontario's Small Business Transition Credit Raises Questions

On May 14, 2010, the Ontario Government released Ontario Tax Tip 7 "Prepare for Ontario's HST: Small Business Transition Support" in which Ontario discusses a payment small business would receive to offset costs of modifying systems in order to transition to harmonized sales tax (HST).  Ontario Tax Tip 7 is intended to help small businesses understand if they are eligible for a small business transition support payment and explain how the support payment will be delivered to them. This support payment has been commonly referred to as the “Small Business Transition Credit”.

In order to qualify for a transition support payment, an eligible business must:

  • not be a listed financial institution under the Excise Tax Act (Canada);
  • carry on business in Ontario and be a GST/HST registrant on July 1, 2010;
  • make GST/HST taxable supplies (including zero-rated supplies) in the course of carrying on business;  and
  • have taxable annual revenues of less than $2 million (as announced in the 2010 Ontario Budget, the province will prescribe the 12-month period for calculating the $2 million taxable revenue threshold for purposes of the transition support payment).

If a small business for the transitional support payment, the amount the business will receive will be based on the following:

Total Quarterly Taxable Revenues Amount of Transition Support Payment
Up to and Including $15,000 $300
Over $15,000 and Up to and Including $50,000 2% of Taxable Revenue for the Quarter
Over $50,000 and Up to and Including $500,000 $1000

How is the Ontario Government going to program the computers to identify sole proprietorships and partnerships (joint ventures) and other businesses that are not separate legal entities?  There are many forms of small businesses that are not Ontario incorporated entities.  There are many forms of business that do not file separate tax returns.  A sole proprietor would report business income on his/her personal income tax return.  A partnership is not a legal entity for income tax purposes and the partners report business income and business losses on their respective income tax returns. 

Will the Canada Revenue Agency look at both income tax returns and GST/HST returns?  If the CRA is going to look at GST/HST returns, how will the annual filers be found and their quarterly sales revenues determined?

Are branches of foreign companies going to be treated differently than Ontario corporations?  If so, this approach would not encourage foreign direct investment to Ontario.

Are municipalities, schools, school boards, hospitals and other MUSH sector entities entitled to receive the small business transition credit if their taxable sales fall within the thresholds?

What is the Ontario Government going to do to prevent abuse?  What if a person registered 1000 corporations in June 2010?  Would they receive $30,000 from the Ontario Government even if each reported revenues of $10?

There are a number of questions that need to be answered so that all small businesses are recognized.  Equally as important, questions need to be asked so that cheques are not blindly written to HST-abuse vehicles.

Small businesses will need the financial assistance because it will cost more than $300-$1000 to implement the necessary changes correctly.  The problem is that there are problems with the mechanism.

Finally, I should mention that the small business support is taxable for income tax purposes.  The Department of Finance confirmed this today at the Southern Ontario Commodity Tax Group Meeting at the Toronto Board of Trade.

Beware: Some Tips to Save HST Are Wrong

On May 12, 2010, the Globe and Mail ran a print article entitled "Tips for cheating the harmonized sales taxman".  Some of the tips provided in the origin version were incorrect and have been removed in the online version.

Printed Version:

Tip 1 "Buy Now, Use Later

Even if you prepay, you still pay HST on services used after July 1.  But products aren't subject to that rule.  So if you know the purchase of some durable product (e.g. washing machine, fall wardrobe, camping gear) is in your near future, buy it before July 1, even if it sits unused.  In fact, since HST adds 8 per cent and you can borrow money at a much lower rate, do this even if you save to take a short term loan to do so."

This advice is INCORRECT.  First, durable goods, including washing machines, fall wardrobes and camping equipment, are subject to Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) at the rate of 8%.  So, if a consumer buys goods before July 1, 2010, they will be paying a combined sales tax rates (GST and ORST) of 13%. Second, the transition rule applies to services and goods.  If you buy a good to be delivered before July 1, 2010, ORST and GST are payable.  If you buy a good before July 1, 2010 and the good is delivered after July 1, 2010, the good will be subject to GST and HST.

Printed Version:

Tip 2 "Get to Know the Internet

Look for retailers in Alberta and other "tax havens". They won't charge you HST or even PST if you have an out-of-their province shipping address.  Even after paying shipping and handling, you'll save money."

This advice is also INCORRECT.  Due to the HST place of supply rules for goods (also known as tangible personal property), a GST registrant in Alberta would be required to charge, collect and remit HST if the goods are shipped to an address in the HST Zone (Ontario, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick or Newfoundland/Labrador).  if you buy goods in Alberta and pay for shipping to Manitoba, you will not be required to pay HST.  However, if you live in Ontario, you will have to pay for someone to ship the goods from Manitoba to Ontario.  This second shipping may wipe out any HST savings.  Further, the transshipment may add risk of loss or damage to the transaction.

Printed Version:

Tip 5 "Get on the Internet

The government has a rebate program and the exempted products and services are many and varied.  You can't adjust your spending until you know where the tax applies and doesn't"

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British Columbia Government Restructures Itself To Save HST Costs

The Globe and Mail newspaper is reporting in an article entitled "B.C. alters health structure to avoid $3.5 million HST bill" published on May 7, 2010 that the British Columbia is undergoing a restructuring. The B.C. Ministry of Health Services and the CEOs of the provincial health authorities have agreed to tuck the Shared Services Organization, which provides services such as computer support and bulk purchasing for the health sector, under one of the health departments / crown entities.

The reason for the reorganization is that the Shared Services Organization would otherwise be required to charge HST on supplies made to the Government of British Columbia and other provincial health entities AND cannot recover all of the HST by way of input tax credits or public service bodies rebates.  Hopefully we will get more detailed about the reorganization to learn whether the changes create exempt supplies (instead of taxable supplies) or non-taxable labour.  This will help us identify other HST savings opportunities.

The question that taxpayers should be asking is whether the Ontario Government and the B.C Government have undertaken a complete analysis of their internal operations in order to address all situations where the provincial government must pay #HST (and GST) on supplies made in the province (or to businesses in HST provinces) that is not recoverable.  We should be asking if HST is going to cause provincial budgets to balloon.  We should be asking whether those who are implementing HST recognize the cost effects associated with HST.  Proof of understanding the cost effects is the government itself taking steps to minimize the negative effects within the government spending structure.

I would guess that the Ontario Government has not asked each and every government employee and manager and Deputy Minister to go over their budgets to identify unrecoverable HST costs within Ministry, department and Crown entity budgets.  Let's wait for the NDP and Conservative opposition parties to find what the governing HST Liberals have overlooked.  I will predict a few big budget line items increasing due to unrecoverable HST.  This will be a topic for discussion and accountability into the future (after HST implementation).  I wonder if the Ontario Ombudsman is going to be busy looking at HST issues.

The other side to this story is that if the BC and Ontario governments must reorganize due to HST,: what about businesses?  Both Ontario and British Columbia have said that HST will reduce administrative costs for business.  Well, here is an example within the BC Government that shows an INCREASE in administrative costs resulting from the implementation of HST.  The reality is that HST will increase administrative costs for certain businesses (especially where amounts are paid for services and other goods and services not subject to provincial sales tax).

The tax officials' counter-argument is that businesses (like the BC Government) can reorganize to avoid increased HST administrative costs.  That is correct.  Steps may, in certain cases, be made to minimize HST costs.  However, the restructuring of business organizations will cost businesses money - legal fees, accounting fees, advisors fees, etc.  So, businesses must spend money during the worst economic recession in recent years in order to save HST in the future.  In addition, any business that reorganizes will have to ask questions whether their restructuring may be challenged by the Canada Revenue Agency using the GST/HST general anti-avoidance rule.  It may not be so simple.

HST Will Cost Municipalities

The Sudbury Star has posted an article that harmonized sales tax will cost the City of Sudbury $450,000 per year.  This will mean a budget shortfall and potentially higher municipal taxes. 

Under the federal Excise Tax Act (Canada), where a municipality makes exempt supplies (and cannot recover the amounts paid as GST as input tax credits), the municipality may claim a rebate of 100% of the GST.  So, under the GST regime, municipalities are tax neutral.  This will continue for the 5% GST portion of expenditure by municipalities.

However, under the HST, the 8% provincial component in Ontario is not fully recoverable.  There are two scenarios.  First, if the HST paid by the municipality matches with a exempt supply by the municipality, the rebate is 78% of the 8% provincial HST component.  For example, if a municipality paid $100,000 for third party snow removal services, the municipality would pay $5,000 GST (that is fully recoverable) and $8,000 OHST.  Only 82% of the $8,000 is recoverable by the municipality by way of a rebate.  The remaining 22% is an unrecoverable cost to the municipality.

Second, the municipality may be caught by the restricted input tax credit rules if the municipality sells more than $10 million in taxable supplies in a year.  I would expect that the City of Sudbury would fit into this category.  Under the restricted input tax credit rules, the OHST component of purchases of energy, certain telecommunications, certain vehicles and fuel and meals and entertainment are not recoverable for a number of years after implementation of HST.  For example, if the municipality purchases electricity that is allocable to taxable activities (e.g., the municipal skating rink, swimming pools, etc.) and the cost over a year is $1,000,000, the $80,000 in HST is unrecoverable if incurred in after July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2013.

HST also means that consumers will pay more for certain property and services acquired from the City.  The article provides the following examples:

* A one-year adult membership at Howard Armstrong Recreational Centre will jump from $218.25 to $235;

* A three-month child, youth or senior pass to city swimming pool will jump from $59.50 to $64;

* The 25-week Walk Your Way to Wellness Program for seniors will jump from $92 to $99;

* Ice rental for the Walden Oldtimers Hockey Tournament will go from $209 to $260;

* A plot in the city's Veteran's cemetery will go from $954 to $1,027;

* Adult athletic field rates will go from $57.50 per game to $62 per game. The cost of lights, if needed, will go from $17.75 an hour to $19 an hour;

* Renting the chalets at Adanac or Fielding Park for a Saturday night will jump from $174.75 to $188;

* Use of weigh scales at city landfill sites will jump from $16.25 to $17.50.
 

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Ontario Releases HST Tips for Public Service Bodies

On April 19, 2010 the Ontario Ministry of Revenue issued Tax Tip #5 "Public Service Bodies" to give guidance to public service bodies about how harmonized sales tax implementation will affect them.  It is important to note that the document itself says it was issued in "April 2010", which is technically correct - but it may be misleading in 2 years or more when an auditor wishes to use this document against a PSB in the context of an audit.  I  am looking into my crystal ball and see an auditor telling a PSB that they had an entire month before the May 1, 2010 transition rule date to read the document.

This tax tip is for PSBs, which includes charities, municipalities, universities, public colleges, school authorities, hospital authorities and non-profit organizations.  These entities provide exempt supplies (at least in part) and are not entitled to claim full input tax credits to recover goods and services tax (GST) and harmonized sales tax (to the extent that it is applicable on their purchases).  That being said, these entities may be entitled to claim certain public service body rebates:

Type of PSB Federal Rebate Percentage (of GST) Ontario Rebate Percentage (of HST)
Municipalities 100% 78%
Universities and Public Colleges established and operated on a non-profit basis 67% 93%
School Authorities established and operated on a non-profit basis 68% 93%
Hospital Authorities (only for activities of operating a public hospital), Hospitals (for eligible activities other than the operations of a public hospital) and facility operators and external providers (for eligible activities) 83% 87%
Charities and Qualifying Non-profit Organizations 50% 82%

It is important to note that the provincial rebate percentage in other provinces in the HST Zone (e.g., British Columbia) are different.

What this chart means is that if a charity makes a purchase for $100, it will pay $5 in GST and $8 in HST.  The charity is entitled to a PSB rebate of $2.50 of the GST and $6.56 of the HST.  The charity does not recover $3.94, which is an unrecoverable expense.  When the charity completes its GST/HST return, it must claim the rebate amounts and fill out all the necessary paperwork to recover the $2.50 and $6.56.  While recovery of otherwise unrecoverable amounts is good - there are administrative costs that need to be acknowledged (for which compensation is not available).

Tax Tip #5 covers the mere basics regarding (1) registration (including the small supplier threshold), (2) charging HST, (3) self-assessment (including the transition period between October 14, 2009 and May 1, 2010 - but does not give much assistance), (4) rebates, (5) quick method accounting, (6) special net tax calculation for charities, etc.

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Effective Communication Will Be The Key To A Successful HST Compliance Program

After a business realizes that harmonized sales tax (HST) is coming and that changes are required to systems and documentation, the business must figure out what is necessary to ensure compliance.  The government publications help, but do not give enough information to make sure that businesses know what they must do to comply.

It is not sufficient for the Ontario Ministry of Revenue to announce that HST is 13%, HST is payable and collectible where GST is payable and collectible (except if a point of sale rebate is permitted), the implementation day is July 1, 2010, there are transition rules and place of supply rules and most businesses should stop charging Ontario retail sales tax on July 1.  What is missing is effective communication on what steps businesses should take to prepare.  This trial and error approach is costly for businesses - Businesses should try to comply and government will tell them where the mistakes were made by assessing GST/HST, interest and/or penalties.

The onus (and I do not mean legal onus or burden of proof) is on suppliers (sellers/retailers) and recipients (buyers/[purchasers) to figure out the legal requirements and be perfect in their implementation of the law (to the extend it is currently passed) and administrative statements (to the extent they are written and accurately reflect the written or unwritten law) and place of supply rules (which have not been passed by way of law or promulgated by way of regulation yet).  In other words, the communication from government to businesses is insufficient to ensure compliance.

In addition, businesses must effectively communicate within the organization in order to ensure compliance.  Someone must do their best to understand the HST rules and communicate the rules within the organization so that the proper system changes are made.  If the tax department/Chief Financial Officer does not discuss HST implementation with the sales department, the sales persons might not know what is subject to HST and what is not.  The sales persons may not understand when an invoice should include HST and when HST is not payable.  The sales persons might not know that they must charge HST on sales made in May and June if delivery occurs after July 1, 2010.

In addition, the computerized systems cannot change themselves.  Usually there is the information technology (IT) guru within an organization that must write computer source code or undertake configurations to ensure that HST is charged on invoices.  If there is not effective communication with the IT guru about what changes need to be made to electronic documents and computerized systems to record HST, the computers may be of little help in fulfilling their important role(s).

In addition, the IT guru may have to make adjustments to accounting systems so that the record keeping/ accounting programs track the GST and HST properly.  The computer system will be a useful tool to ensure GST and HST collected is added / reported correctly when GST/HST Returns must be completed and filed electronically (or in paper format).  The computer system will be a central tool in recording and reporting input tax credits, rebates, refund and restricted input tax credits.  If the IT guru does not receive clear instructions, he/she might not make all the necessary changes.

Effective compliance often includes an internal audit or monitoring of the systems to ensure that accurate information is communicated.  If no one has this role / function within their job description, the job might not be performed.

If problems are discovered, effective communication is necessary to make new and further adjustments to the system.  For example, if a September 1, 2010 invoice to the Government of Ontario did not include GST and HST (because prior to HST implementation neither taxes were charged), whoever discovers the problem will need to communicate the mistake internally within the organization so that the sales people, the IT guru, human resources, the tax department or CFO and others make the necessary changes.  Someone will also need to contact the Government of Ontario and send the invoice for the GST/HST or amended invoice including GST/HST.

Finally, I have to point out that effective communication extends to lawyers, accountants, customs brokers and other service providers.  A business will get incorrect/incomplete answers to questions if there is ineffective communication to outside service providers.  If you are going to rely on a service provider's help, you need to communicate all the relevant facts and instructions - otherwise the advice or services that you expect to be provided to you may not be provided.

Make An HST CheckList

Harmonized Sales Tax (“HST") will become a reality in Ontario and British Columbia on July 1, 2010. However, some businesses will be required to start collecting HST on May 1, 2010. In addition, some businesses outside the HST Zone ( HST Zone = Ontario, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland/Labrador) will also be required to charge collect and remit HST to the Federal Government in accordance with the place of supply rules when the place of supply is within the HST Zone.

It is time to make a “To-Do" list to get ready for HST. The Canadian Federation of Independent Businesses (CFIB) has released an HST checklist this week.

The CFIB list applies for businesses with gross revenues less than $10 million. This is not limited to corporations, trusts, partnerships or sole proprietorships, it also includes family of businesses that are related to each other as the threshold test would be applicable to persons and their related entities.

The checklist below builds on the CFIB list is as follows:

  • Formulate an internal committee of persons who will oversee the HST conversion - the group includes more than top management and the tax specialist/chief financial officer. Plan to meet weekly and prepare checklists.
  • Calculate a budget to address HST conversion issues, including information technology programmers to update your systems and advisors on HST.
  • Contact the persons in your business responsible for information technology as they will be on the front-lines in updating your computer systems.
  • Conduct a sales side audit and determine whether the supplies made by your business are subject to HST. Your business may be required to charge HST on goods that were not subject to retail sales tax.
  • Update sales equipment (e.g. cash registers) and computer systems in order to properly charge HST.
  • Ensure your invoices properly state whether HST is applicable, the HST rate, your GST/HST registration number, and all other information required by the input tax credit regulations.
  • Consider whether your business may offer point of sale rebates and make adjustments to record-keeping.
  • Conduct a purchase side audit and determine whether your purchases are subject to HST. HST will affect what you sell and what you buy. Purchase exemption certificates will no longer be usable when your business buys what were previously RST exempt goods, such as goods that are purchased to be resupplied.
  • Determine your largest expense items and review your largest contracts to determine what will change with the implementation of HST.
  • Identify which suppliers to your business may not be sophisticated enough about HST and ensure they charge the correct amount of HST. Since the Canada Revenue Agency may assess both suppliers and recipients, purchasers have a duty to check the invoicing of their suppliers.
  • Consider whether HST will affect your cash flow and make arrangements for credit. Commercial rent, inventory, electricity, production equipment & machinery, goods purchased for resupply, custom computer software, etc will be subject to HST (and was not subject to RST).
  • Review the transition rules to see when you must start to collect HST or pay HST and when you must self-assess HST.  It can be as early as May 1, 2010.
  • Determine whether the restricted ITC rules apply to your business/related businesses. If your business is over the $10 million threshold, you will not be able to recover HST paid on certain purchases for the first three years of HST. You will be required to set up accounting records to track and report restricted input tax credits on a province-by-province basis. The reporting on HST returns will start on July 2010 GST/HST return, which must be filed electronically.
  • Determine whether you are required to file GST/HST returns electronically, what method of filing electronically your business must use and make arrangements to be able to file electronically starting in July 2010.
  • Determine whether the place of supply rules require your business to charge HST. If your business operates in more than one province, the assessment must be made on a province-by-province and supply-by-supply basis.
  • Set up accounting records for each applicable HST province.
  • Establish internal policies and procedures to ensure HST is properly charged
  • Prepare written materials for sales staff to follow and train your staff on HST.
  • Update sales equipment so that HST is charged at the point of sale.
  • Update computerized payments so that HST is charged where applicable. In some cases, computer programs will need to be rewritten/updated so that the place of delivery (e.g. goods) is reviewed in determining whether HST is applicable.
  • Adjust online payment software or web interfaces used for selling via the Internet (or receiving payments for services and intangibles via the Internet) to reflect the applicable HST rates.
  • Update the information communicated on websites.
  • Prepare and publish new written materials if the publications include information on sales taxes charged.
  • Update internal computer/record keeping, record keeping on input tax credit claims, rebates, refunds, etc., accounts payable record keeping, accounting records on meals and entertainment expenses and taxable benefit calculations.
  • Update internal reports - e.g., expense reports spreadsheets, employee cars, inter company transactions, etc..
  • Determine whether your business must pay HST on imported goods, services and/or intangible property.
  • Determine whether any inter company payments are subject to HST and make adjustments to records and expectations.
  • Take steps to ensure that the business stops collecting retail sales tax/social services tax on July 1, 2010 and that the final returns are prepared
  • Prepare PST/RST/SST records to be audited as both Ontario and British Columbia have said they plan to conduct four years of audits in the next two years.
  • Consider whether the job descriptions of employees need to be updated to reflect HST responsibilities.
  • Public relations - consider whether you need to educate your customers about HST.

This list is not all-inclusive.