What Does A Seller Do When Someone Refuses To Pay HST?

This is a problem now and the problem will occur more regularly in British Columbia after the referendum results are misstated and people believe the HST should not be charged.  The answer that vendors, sellers & service providers do not want to hear is the only answer to give.

GST/HST registrants are tax collectors for the government.  They must charge, collect and remit the HST or risk an assessment plus interest and penalties.  During an audit by the Canada Revenue Agency ("CRA") will assess the registrant for failure to collect HST or a failure to remit the HST.  This means that if the vendor does not charge the purchaser HST (when he/she should), the CRA will assess the vendor.  If the vendor does charge the HST on the invoice and the buyer does not pay the HST, the vendor must remit that HST to the government with its GST/HST return for the period during which the transaction took place (regardless of whether the money was actually received).  If a vendor fails to remit HST, it will be assessed.

There are special rules for bad debts that do not apply to only the HST portion.  There are also special rules that allow a registrant (seller) to sue a recipient (vendor) for HST, however, these rules only kick in after an assessment by the CRA.

The CRA auditors will not be sympathetic when a vendor does not follow the rules.  Telling an auditor that the buyer refused to pay the HST will fall on deaf ears.  The auditors will not care that the vendor would have lost the sale and the profits related to the sale.

Vendors in British Columbia should post a sign in their shops telling buyers that HST will be collected until the transition date (currently said to be March 2013).  This includes service providers who provide in person services (such as hair salons).  Other vendors and service providers should include a statement in quotations that:

 "Harmonized Sales Tax ("HST") is payable in respect of any property or services provided prior to the date established by the Province of British Columbia and Federal Government of Canada to transition to a provincial sales tax (the "Transition Date").  HST will continue to be charged after the Transition Date if required by law.  All applicable provincial sales taxes are payable in respect of property and services provided after the Transition Date."

This statement may be added to contracts for property or services.

If a buyer does not pay the HST after the property or services are provided, the vendor may pursue the buyer in Small Claims Court or the provincial court for breach of contract.  However, in respect of point of sale refusals, the vendor will have to make a business decision whether to meet refusal with a refusal to make the sale. Service providers and restaurant owners who have provided the service and experience the refusal at the cashier are in a very difficult position and may have no other option but to call the police before the person dashes (while being careful to avoid a false imprisonment claim made against them).

In any event, document any situation where there is a refusal to pay the HST and provide as much detail as possible..  Even if an unsympathetic CRA officer will not accept the information, the Tax Court of Canada may sympathetically suggest that a remission order would be appropriate.

What Will Happen If The "Yes" Vote Wins In British Columbia?

The most important document to study will be the "hard-to-read" Comprehensive Integrated Tax Coordination Agreement between British Columbia and the Government of Canada signed in November 2009 (called the CITCA by tax geeks).  The second most important document to read is the amendment letter to the CITCA signed in March 2010.  A review of the original Memorandum of Understanding may also be helpful. There will be other relevant documents that will be made public voluntarily and through access to information requests to the Government of Canada and the Government of British Columbia.  These documents will need to be reviewed carefully to determine the best plan to move forward.

What exactly will happen will happen in response to a "Yes" vote is yet to be determined.  What we know is that many will not like the plan.  The elimination of the Harmonized Sales Tax ("HST") in British Columbia will not happened immediately on August 26, 2011 if the "Yes" (anti-HST) vote is the successful side.  People celebrating at bars and restaurants will see HST on their bills after the announcement.

Businesses will need time to adjust.  This would be fair to the businesses who are, in reality, the tax collectors from the public.  The businesses will need to know what to do and the mechanisms to collect another tax (even if it is the British Columbia social services tax) will have to be put in place.  Businesses throughout Canada and not just British Columbia will need to adjust their record-keeping systems.  As with HST implementation, a change will involve a lot more work than just changing a tax rate in the computer.

Businesses inside and outside British Columbia will also need to register to collect the replacement tax.  The government will need to launch a new education campaign to communicate the obligations on businesses.  Also with the "To Do List', the government will need its own "To Do List", which will include setting a time line, passing legislation, education of the public (and duck as the tomatoes are thrown), hire people in the Consumer Taxation Branch, train the new employees, prepare policies and bulletins, talk with the Federal Government about repayment, enforcement and other process matters, etc.

If the "Yes" vote wins, GST registrants in British Columbia will still be required to charge, collect and remit HST when they sell to an HST province.  They will still be obligated under the Excise Tax Act (Canada) and regulations thereto to file a GST/HST returns in the future.  The HST Place of Supply Rules will still apply to certain transactions.  So, HST will not be elimniated fully under any change plan.

The rules relating to claiming refunds, rebates and credits under the HST tax system will need to be clarified for B.C. businesses.  There is a possibility that there may be a deadline set for amounts a business or consumer is entitled to receive from the Government of Canada.

If the HST is going to be eliminated, businesses who are registered for GST/HST purposes and entitled to claim input tax credits will take the opportunity to purchase goods and services before the change.  Those businesses that will have to pay unrecoverable provincial sales tax after the change may decide to undertake the expenditures at a time when they can recover HST by way of an input tax credit.  Businesses will take prudent steps to save money while the change occurs. 

Consumers, on the other hand, may delay purchases until after the change occurs when they are purchasing an exempt good, real property, intangible property or services that are not subject to provincial sales tax.  This will most negatively affect the real estate market and the service sector.  There will be transition rules for the change that will need to be developed and communicated.

Consumers outside the province of British Columbia may delay purchases of goods from British Columbia until after the change (or at least after the date of the announcement of the plan for the replacement tax).  The place of supply rules may change and give rise to opportunities to save sales tax.

In the meantime, the Government of British Columbia will undoubtedly talk about repayment of the monies received from the Government of Canada to implement the HST.  There will be talk of new taxes that were not in place in British Columbia before July 1, 2010.  As sure as night follows day, if the "yes" vote is the majority, the blame game will start.

We will continue to watch and report on this developing story - if it develops into a story.  Nothing much will happen if the "No" vote is the majority.

The Canada Revenue Agency Has Released A New Guide For Non-Residents Doing Business In Canada

Non-residents who are doing business in Canada and would like to comply with Canada's Goods and services tax (GST) and harmonized sales (HST) tax laws should review this new gide published by the Canada Revenue Ageny on June 15, 2011. "Doing Business in Canada - GST/HST Information for Non-Residents" is an important document to read.  It is over 38 pages on information that may or may not answer the questions that the non--resident may have about their GTS/HST obligations.

Whether or not a non-resident is actually doing business in Canada is a factual test.  There is no definition of "carrying on business in Canada" in the GST/HST laws.  Pages 7-8 of the CRA's document address the basics and a Canadian sales tax lawyer can help apply the CRA's test in a particular case.

The CRA document addresses many issues, including:

1. Should a non-resident register for GST/HST purposes?

2. How is GST/HST calculated?

3. What are the GTS/HST return filing requirements?

4. What are the place of supply rules for charging HST?

5. How is GST/HST applied on imported goods?

6. How is GST/HST applied on imported services and intangible property?

7. How is GST/HST applied on exported goods, services and intangible property?

8. What are drop shipments and how do the drop shipment rules work?

9. How do non-residents recover GTS/HST by way of a rebate?

Canada Revenue Agency Says Beneficiary (NOT Bare Trust) Should Be GST/HST Registered

It has been the Canada Revenue Agency's position for a long time (since 1993) that a bare trust should not register for GST/HST purposes.  Instead, the beneficiary or beneficiaries should register for GST/HST purposes.

This CRA's position is set out Technical Information Bulletin TIB-068 "Bare Trusts". The CRA believes the following:

  • a bare trust (also referred to as a naked trust) exists where a person (the trustee) is merely vested with the legal title to property and has no other duty to perform, responsibilities to carry out, or powers to exercise as trustee of the trust property;
  • the sole duty of a bare trustee will be to convey legal title to the trust property on demand by and according to the instructions of the beneficial owner(s);
  • the bare trustee does not have any independent power, discretion or responsibility pertaining to the trust property;
  • someone other than the bare trustee controls the property, carries on the commercial activity that relates to the property, and is the "real owner" of the property;
  • the person or persons with the real ownership of the property may be a "beneficiary", or a "settlor" under trust law;

The CRA states the following administrative policy:

Where a trust is viewed by the [CRA] as a bare trust, all powers and responsibilities to manage and/or dispose of the trust property would be reserved to the beneficial owner. As a result, the beneficial owner, rather than the bare trust, would be involved in commercial activities relating to the trust property. Unless the beneficial owner qualifies for small supplier status pursuant to section 148 of the Act, or under one of the exceptions listed in subsection 240(1) of the Act, registration for purposes of the GST would be required. Where there is more than one beneficial owner within the trust arrangement, the small supplier's threshold will be calculated on an individual basis, each beneficial owner being a separate person under the Act, unless the beneficial owners are associated persons for purposes of the Act.

....

[I]n a bare trust situation, since the beneficial owners are considered to be engaged in the commercial activities relating to the trust property, they would be required to account for the GST to the extent of their share of the trust property, to file GST returns, and generally to comply with the obligations placed on registrants under the Act.

Many real estate transactions involve bare trusts.  Those who not aware of the CRA's position likely have made a structuring mistake.  These mistakes may be corrected by way of a voluntary disclosure.

I have been involved in many real estate acquisition transactions and rental activities in which the beneficial owners of real property want to hide their identity from the world at large.  This becomes complicated despite reasonable reasons for hiding.  For example, many years ago, a client knew that the sellers of a desirable piece of real estate would not sell to my client (for all the wrong reasons) and wanted to purchase the property using a bare trust. 

The issue for the CRA is that the bare trust has nothing.  As a result, if GST/HST mistakes are made, it is difficult to assess the GST/HST owed to the government.  Since bare trusts are often used in the context of real property, the property at issue involves greater amounts of GST/HST. 

When a professional looks at the competing interests, the middle ground shows up as a small area.  There are solutions to this problem in many cases if and only if the beneficial owner is not too demanding.  That being said, if the bare trust registers for GST/HST purposes, the CRA may conduct an audit and issue an assessment.  Their policy is clearly stated in TIB-068.  The policy is restated in many other GST/HST memorandum on real property.  "I did not know the law" is not an acceptable excuse.

A GST/HST Joint Venture Election Allows One Co-Venturer To Account For GST/HST

Section 273 of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) authorizes one participant in certain types of joint venture (called the "operator") to account for GST/HST on her behalf and on behalf of the other co-venturers.  For example, if A (25%), B (25%), C (25%) & D (25%) enter into a joint venture, they can appoint A as the operator and A charges, collects, and remits GST/HST and files GST/HST returns on behalf of the joint venture. A also claims input tax credits, refunds, rebates and other GST/HST relief in respect of the activities of the joint venture (to the extent permitted). If the joint venture election is not in place, A, B, C, and D would each have to charge, collect and remit 25% of the GST/HST, take 25% of the input tax credits and other relief, and file separate GST/HST returns.

The bad news is that not all joint ventures are entitled to take advantage of this election option.  Only oil and gas exploration joint ventures and prescribed joint ventures can benefit at this time.  That being said, the list of prescribed joint ventures was recently amended (after 20 years) and the Department of Finance is willing to consider making additions in the future.  The list of prescribed joint ventures is set out in the Joint Venture GST/HST Regulations:

  • the construction of real property, including feasibility studies, design work, development activities and the tendering of bids, where undertaken in furtherance of a joint venture for the construction of real property;
  • the exercise of the rights or privileges, or the performance of the duties or obligations, of ownership of an interest in real property, including related construction or development activities, the purpose of which is to derive revenue from the property by way of sale, lease, licence or similar arrangement;
  • the marketing by the operator of a joint venture, under any agreement between the operator and a co-venturer, of all or part of the co-venturer’s share of the output of the joint venture provided that the output arises from an activity conducted under the agreement referred to in subsection 273(1) of the Act;
  • the transportation of natural gas liquids by means of a pipeline that operates as a common carrier of natural gas liquids;
  • the operation of a facility that is used to generate electricity;
  • the operation of a transmission line that is used to transmit electrical power;
  • the processing of output (in this paragraph referred to as the “refinement”) that arises from the exploration or exploitation of a timber resource, including any jointly conducted exploration or exploitation activity of which the output is processed under the agreement referred to in subsection 273(1) of the Act in respect of the refinement and the marketing of the processed or unprocessed output that arises from that activity;
  • the production of a fertilizer and its marketing;
  • the disposal of waste, including the collection and transportation of waste that is in furtherance of that disposal;
  • the exercise of rights or privileges, or the performance of duties or obligations, of ownership of an interest in an animal for the purposes of deriving revenue from prizewinning, stud service fees or sale;
  • the maintenance of a road, other than maintenance that is an exempt supply;
  • the operation and maintenance of the North Warning System;
  • the operation of a farming business within the meaning of the Income Tax Act;
  • the production of liquid methanol from natural gas;
  • the generation and recording of seismic data; and
  • the operation of a lumber, plywood, shake and shingle, pulp, paper or similar wood processing facility.

With respect to commercial real estate, there are certain restrictions in the activities that are prescribed above.

There are a number of rules that must be followed.  Some of the most important (but not all the rules) are:

1. There MUST be a written joint venture agreement;

2. The co-venturers MUST complete the joint venture election forms (GST Form 21 and GST Form 355); and

3. The parties to the joint venture are jointly and severally liable for all GST/HST obligations of the joint venture.

The structuring of joint ventures can be complicated and meeting the requirements of the Canada Revenue Agency requires strategic planning.  There are great benefits, but also pitfalls.

If GST/HST Registrant Buys Real Property, The Registrant Should Not Pay GST/HST to Vendor

I was recently called by a person who purchased a hotel property from a vendor.  The buyer paid GST/HST to the vendor.  The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has denied the input tax credit on the basis that GST/HST was not payable and, therefore, the GST/HST was paid in error.  The CRA has said that since the error was not discovered until after 2 years after the payment, they will not give a refund of tax paid in error.  This real property is used in commercial activities and the Government of Canada gets its GST/HST on accommodations, food sales, etc.

Here is the starting point of the analysis - Subsection 221(1) of the Excise Tax Act provides that every person who makes a taxable supply in Canada must collect GST/HST payable by the recipient in respect of the supply. BUT, paragraph 221(2) of the Excise Tax Act sets out important relief:

"A supplier (other than a prescribed supplier) who makes a taxable supply of real property by way of sale is not required to collect tax under Division II payable by the recipient in respect of the supply where ...  (b) the recipient is registered [for GST/HST purposes] and, in the case of a recipient who is an individual, the property is neither a residential complex nor supplied as a cemetery plot or place of burial, entombment or deposit of human remains or ashes."

What means that the supplier is not required to collect GST/HST when the buyer is registered for GST/HST purposes and purchases certain real property.

This blog post to is intended to help buyers not get themselves into the same mess.

The problem faced by this person should be fixed.  Since solutions are unique, you will have to continue to read The HST Blog to learn how.  When I hear of unfairness like this, I am inspired to help.

The ABCs of Harmonized Sales Tax

Harmonized sales tax ("HST") is here to stay in Ontario for 5 years due to the arrangement between Premier McGuinty and the Government of Canada.  The provincial portion of the rate (currently 8% and called PVAT to those in the know) may be altered on or after July 1, 2012.

Now for something serious and not so serious at times - the ABCs of HST:

A is for Almost Everything - HST covers almost everything;

B is for Bookkeeping - Registrants need to keep detailed records and maintain books are records that can be audited by the Canada Revenue Agency Auditors;

C is for Canada Revenue Agency - The CRA enforces the HST (both the GST and PVAT portions);

D is for Documentary Requirements - A top 10 audit issue is that registrations do not maintain adequate information to support input tax credit and refund claims;

E is for Exemptions - Exempt means that HST/GST is not charged, but the supplier is not entitled to claim input tax credits - so GST/HST is passed on in the price of the property/services;

F is for Filings - Registrants must file their GST/HST returns on time and large businesses must recapture ITCs on time and builders must report certain information in their filings or face costly penalties;

G is for Government Contracts - Suppliers to the Ontario, British Columbia and Nova Scotia Governments must charge GST/HST (previously Ontario and BC did not pay GST or PST);

H is for HST - should have expected this one - or I could have written "Hated Sales Tax";

I is for Input Tax Credits - ITCs are good for businesses engaged in commercial activities who get to recover GST/HST on business inputs (good until they get audited and mistakes are found);

J is for Judge - If you disagree with the CRA about an assessment, file a notice of objection and notice of appeal and take the dispute to a Tax Court of Canada judge;

K is for Knowledgeable - While it is self-serving, you need to talk to a knowledgeable practitioner as the HST rules are complicated;

L is for Legislation - the Excise Tax Act needs to be updated - we have not had a good review since 1997;

M is for MUSH Sector - The MUSH (Municipalities, Universities, Schools, Hospitals) sector have a rebate scheme and difficult rules;

N is for Non-Residents - Businesses outside Ontario (e.g., in other Canadian provinces, the United States and overseas) may be required to charge, collect and remit HST and do not know or understand it;

O is for Ontario Retail Sales Tax - HST replaces ORST, but ORST is still applicable on used car sales and certain insurance premiums;

P is for Place of Supply Rules - Whether you charge HST depends in part on the application of the place of supply rules, which determine if the supply takes place in an HST province and which HST province;

Q is for Quick Method - really a misnomer because it is not quick and some people using it will have to apply special transition rules;

R is for Recaptured ITCS - Large businesses (those that make over $10 million is sales per annual alone or with affiliated entities) must pay back certain ITCs claimed relating to PVAT and must report on monthly GST/HST return;

S is for Small Suppliers - Small supplier do not have to register for GST/HST purposes;

T is for  Technology - Technology helps capture and report GST/HST information - this cannot be done manually;

U is for Unhappy Consumers - Consumers are paying more on electricity, home heating, bikes, services, etc because of HST;

V is for Voluntary Disclosures - If you make a mistake and have not been contacted by a CRA auditor, you may consider making a non-names voluntary disclosure via a practitioner so save paying a penalty;

W is for web-site - go to www.thehstblog.com for information on HST or www.cra.gc.ca;

X is for Xerox - you need to keep good records as evidence to show auditors - you need to invest in a good scanner or photocopier;

Y is for Yikes - This is what a person says when they hear they will be audited for HST (probably say something else - but this is a clean web-site); and

Z is for Zero-rated - If property or services are zero-rated, you pay GST/HST at a rate of 0% and the supplier gets an input tax credit (therefore, health care and educational services should be zero-rated instead of exempt).

Cascading Taxes: When Is HST Payable In Addition To/Including Another Tax?

A tax on a tax is called a "cascading tax".  Cascading taxes are common in today's world.  As a general rule, most new taxes and levies can result in cascading tax (HST charged on top of the new tax) unless the provincial government asks the federal cabinet to list the new tax in a regulation.

Goods and services tax (GST) and harmonized sales tax (if applicable) (HST) is calculated on the consideration payable for a supply of property or services.  Subsection 154(2) of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) provides that "the consideration for a supply of property or a service includes:

(a) any tax, duty or fee imposed under an Act of Parliament [that means federal laws] that is payable by the recipient or payable or collectible by the supplier, in respect of that supply or in respect of the production, importation, consumption or use of the property or service [other than GST/HST];

(b) any provincial levy [intended to cover provincial laws] that is payable by the recipient or payable or collectible by the supplier, in respect of that supply or in respect of the consumption or use of the property or service, other than a prescribed provincial levy that is payable by the recipient [that means it is in a regulation]; and

(c) any other amount that is collectible by the supplier under an Act of the legislature of any province and that is equal to, or is collectible on account of or in lieu of, a provincial levy, except where the amount is payable by the recipient and the provincial levy is a prescribed levy."

The term "provincial levy" is defined to mean "a tax, duty or fee imposed under an Act of the legislature of a province in respect of the supply, consumption or use of the property  or a service."  What is most significant about this definition is that unless the levy is imposed pursuant to an Act of the legislature of the province, GST/HST would not be payable on the tax-included price. It is always necessary to go to the source of the taxation/fee/levy.

The Taxes, Duties and Fees (GST/HST) Regulations contain a negative list of provincial levies that are excluded from the GST/HST calculation.  If the provincial law is not in the list, then the provincial levy is included in the price for the purposes of calculating GST/HST.

Ontario has a very short list including the following:

  • the Land Transfer Tax Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. L.6,
  • Chapter 760 of the City of Toronto Municipal Code, made under Part X of the City of Toronto Act, 2006, S.O. 2006, c. 11, Sched. A, if the tax, duty or fee would have applied to that transfer under that chapter as it read on February 1, 2008

The Taxes, Duties and Fees (GST/HST) Regulations also prescribe in the list "a tax imposed by the legislature of a province, under an Act referred to in the definition of "general sales tax rate", which includes subsection 2(1) of the Retail Sales Tax Act (Ontario). This exclusion is more complicated, but has been generally applied to exclude Ontario retail sales tax from the calculation of GST.

Now that Ontario has harmonized and is not using the Retail Sales Tax Act to impose taxes representing significant revenue, any new provincial levy may be included in the GST/HST calculation as it would not be listed by the Taxes, Duties and Fees (GST/HST) Regulations.  I say "may" because the other requirements in section 154 of the Excise Tax Act would have to be met. To be excluded from the GST/HST calculation, new taxes must fall within a listed Act in the manner it is identified or the provincial government must ask the Government of Canada (specifically federal cabinet) to change the regulation.

It seems as if in most situations, suppliers assume (and act as if) the tax/fee is included in the calculation of GST/HST because it is the safe thing to do.  However, questions are not asked if this is correct.   For every provincial levy or charge that we might be inclined to include for the purposes of calculating GST/HST, we must ask questions before including the fee in the calculation:

  • Is the tax/fee imposed pursuant to a law of Canada?
  • Is the tax/fee imposed pursuant to an Act of the legislature of a province?
  • Is the tax/fee imposed by a regulation or a rule and there isn't a charging provision in an Act of the legislature (I an thinking carefully about the ecotaxes)?
  • Is the tax/fee imposed under a municipal by-law?
  • On what is the tax/fee imposed?
  • Is a recipient of a supply responsible for paying the tax/fee under the law imposing the tax/fee?
  • Is the supplier of the supply required to collect the tax/fee?

I have serious questions whether the Toronto plastic bag fee is subject to HST.  I have serious questions whether GST/HST should have been charged on top of the ecotaxes.  I have questions whether certain destination marketing fees are subject to GST/HST.  I think that consumers are paying GST/HST on top of many taxes and fees when the GST/HST laws do not require GST/HST to be charged.

The unfortunate reality is that the implementation of HST has incentivized Ontario and British Columbia to cause prices to increase so that they get more HST revenues.  It is in the interest of the government for retailers and suppliers to make mistakes and overcharge consumers.  It is no longer in the interest of Ontario and British Columbia to list new provincial levies in the Taxes, Duties and Fees (GST/HST) Regulations.  It is no longer in the interests of the leaders to keep prices down for consumers.

For this reason, it is more important than ever for businesses and retailers to understand the law and force the governments to follow the law.  It is more important than ever before that provincial levies are imposed in a transparent manner.  It is more important than ever for the people to make it known that there is a cascading tax and the government is accountable to them and needs to request the new tax to be listed.

Continue Reading...

File Opening Forms May Provide Useful Information to Auditors

I am a big fan of anticipating a problem during a Canada Revenue Agency audit and solving the problem before it happens.  File opening forms may provide useful information to a CRA auditor.  The first thing they do is they inform the CRA auditor that you are diligent.  You took your GST/HST compliance responsibilities seriously.  You tried to ask the right questions in order to bill correctly.

A file opening form can be useful in recording the information that will allow you to determine whether the harmonized sales tax (HST) place of supply rules apply and at what rate you should be charging HST.

There isn't a single form that will work for all businesses - in other words, you would be wise to work with an HST lawyer or expert to develop the form and learn how to analyze the information on the form in a diligent manner.  If you have a billing policy, then you are more likely to get the answer right.

Some of the information that may be included on a file opening form (and I want to make it clear that this is not an all inclusive list) is:

  1. Date
  2. The correct legal name of the client/customer
  3. If the client is incorporated, the jurisdiction of the corporation and the incorporation number
  4. If the client is a partnership, the jurisdiction of the partnership and the partnership registration number
  5. The head office address or the address at which the individuals are located who provide instructions to you
  6. Name of the prime contact who will be giving instructions
  7. The normal location of that person
  8. Telephone number of the prime contact
  9. Fax number of the prime contact
  10. Email address of the prime contact
  11. If different than 6, the name of the person who hired you
  12. If different than 7, the normal location of the person who hired you
  13. If different than 8, the telephone number of the person who hired you
  14. Will you be providing (a) goods, (b) services, (c) real property, (4) intangible property, or (e) other
  15. A short statement of the proposed work
  16. If you are selling goods, the address to which goods will be shipped
  17. If you are providing services in respect of real property, the address at which you will be providing the services or the location of real property at issue
  18. Your client's/customer's GST/HST registration number

We would be willing to create a special file opening form for your business (for a fee to be determined based on the work involved - e.g., simple business would be $250 plus all applicable taxes).  We will ask more detailed questions about your business and add prompts for information that you will need to apply the HST place of supply rules (and ward away assessments).  We will teach you how to read the information so that you can charge the right amount of HST given your unique circumstances.  To prepare upfront, at the time of file opening, will in all likelihood be less expensive than a CRA assessment.

For more information, please contact me at 416-760-8999.  I am a Canadian sales tax lawyer.

Registrant Purchasers of Real Property Should Update Certificates

The GST rules (now the HST rules) have historically allowed a supplier (seller) of taxable real property to make a supply to a recipient (purchaser) and not collect GST/HST in respect of the real property if the purchaser is registered for GST/HST purposes and provides a written certification of registration status.  The relevant sections of the Excise Tax Act are subsections 123(1), 221(2) and 228(4).

What happens in these real property transactions is that the purchaser provides the seller a certification at closing and the supplier verifies the purchasers GST/HST registration number with the Canada Revenue Agency (as a due diligence step).  If the certification is verified by the Canada Revenue Agency, the seller does not collect GST/HST from the purchaser at the time of the closing/transfer and the purchaser self-assesses GST/HST on its GST/HST return for the period in which the transaction took place.  On the GST/HST return, the purchaser indicates the amount of GST/HST he/she/it is self-assessing and takes an input tax credit  on the same return to neutralize the cash flow effect. The purchaser also files a GST Form 60 with its GST/HST return.

These certifications are not a prescribed form (that is the CRA has not developed a form to complete) and many lawyers and real property businesses have developed a precedent that they use.  These precedent certifications need to be updated to account for HST.

I would recommend that the new certifications include the following information:

  1. The Recipient's (buyer's) correct legal name;
  2. The Recipient's GST/HST number;
  3. The Recipient's reporting period (not necessary, but helpful to diarize self-assessment deadline);
  4. The Recipient's mailing address in the Canada Revenue Agency's records (I have needed this in the past to verify items 1 and 2);
  5. The municipal address of the real property (in order to make HST place of supply determination at the time f the self assessment)
  6. The transfer value of the real property; and
  7. The rate of HST applicable (based on 5 and 6).

The Registrant Real Property Certification should make reference to both GST and HST on a going forward basis so as not to confuse the auditor who wants to raise a big assessment against the parties.

We have prepared such precedent certificates for transactions and will be willing to sell a precedent for a flat rate of $100 (the cost of which can be recoverable).

I am Giving an HST Presentation for Graphic Designers on July 21

I am giving a webinar on July 21, 2010 at noon (EST) organized and hosted by the Association of Registered Graphic Designers - Ontario.  Members and non-members are permitted to register for the webinar.  I will spend time looking at the harmonized sales tax (HST) place of supply rules applicable to various types of graphic designers. I will also talk about things you can do to improve compliance with HST rules.  If you would like to register, please go here.

New Canada Revenue Agency Guides Help With New Housing Rebate Calculations

Tomorrow Is The Last Pre-HST Day, Do You Have Any Purchases to Make

Tomorrow is June 30, 2010, the last day before the sales tax world in Ontario and British Columbia changes.  Today you should ask yourself, CAN I MAKE A PURCHASE AND SAVE HST.

Consumers will be thinking about saving HST. The question that needs to be asked is what is not subject to Ontario retail sales tax, but will be subject to HST.  I cannot provide an all-inclusive list.  However, here are a few suggestions on what you might buy today:

  • land survey (I am doing this today believe it or not)
  • landscaping services
  • house cleaning services
  • painting services
  • if you sign an agreement of purchase and sale of a previously lived-in home, you may save the real estate commission
  • if you take possession and title of a newly built home before July 1, 2010, you save the HST
  • hair dressing/colouring services
  • manicure/pedicure
  • massage
  • dry cleaning
  • taking Rover to the vet
  • visiting the dentist for teeth whitening (not on my list - sorry Dr Jay)
  • ask a lawyer to draft a will or a pre-nuptial agreement
  • buy a domain name (is your name taken yet?)
  • fill up your home heating fuel tank
  • propane for the summer barbeque
  • clean the swimming pool
  • one last pre-HST Botox injection
  • one last work-out at the gym
  • energy-efficient home appliances are exempt from ORST
  • bicycles are exempt from ORST
  • custom computer software is exempt from ORST
  • subscription to Cosmo, Oprah, Mike Holmes or any magazine that interests you
  • notice in the newspaper about a garage sale, birth notice, death notice, in memoriam, etc.
  • ticket to see a play in a small local theater
  • ticket to a dinner theater
  • pre-paid funeral expenses/deposit on final resting place

What is on your list?

I will be writing another post tomorrow on the purchases that businesses have been waiting to make in order to save the unrecoverable ORST and recover HST by way of input tax credit.

Have You Picked "The Chosen One" in Accounts Payable?

One risk-management step that is often over-looked in a time of sales tax reform is selecting "The Chosen One" in accounts payable who is tasked with reviewing all incoming invoices to ensure that suppliers are properly charging sales taxes. 

When auditors arrive with their spreadsheets in hand, they conduct a (1) purchase side audit and (2) a sales side audit. During the purchase side audit, the auditor reviews a sample of incoming invoices to ensure that the business under audit has paid the right amount of sales tax on its business inputs.  Where a supplier to the business does not charge retail sales tax (ORST) or goods and services tax (GST), the auditor will assess the purchaser business - as it is allowed to do under the law.

Businesses can control this assessment risk by assigning the task of reviewing incoming invoices to a trained person - "The Chosen One".  This accounts payable employee will review each incoming invoice and either seek corrections from the supplier or make arrangements to self-assess the tax that is applicable, but not charged.

With the start of harmonized sales tax (HST) in the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia, this is a perfect time to ensure that someone is actively reviewing incoming invoices.  First, you will want to make sure that suppliers are no longer charging ORST on invoices for goods and services provided after June 30, 2010.  If a supplier still shows ORST or PST (provincial sales tax) or RST (retail sales tax) as being charged on the invoice, you will want to follow-up and ask for a revised invoice.  It must be clear that ORST/PST/RST is not being charged.  It may be that HST is being charged, but it must be clear so that an auditor is not confused.

On that point, HST is supposed to be a single combined tax.  The vendor is not supposed to separate the charges into GST and HST on the invoice (except where the supplies are subject to the recaptured ITC rules).  As a result, in Ontario, the invoice should identify 13% HST and no 5% GST and 8% HST separately.

In addition, "The Chosen One" should review incoming invoices to ensure that HST is being charged where applicable.  As a result , you will need to determine when you must pay HST (not just when you must charge HST).  You will have to understand the HST place of supply rules as they apply to purchases.

Businesses outside the HST Zone will also have to have "The Chosen One" selected and briefed on the HST place of supply rules.  You should expect to see some invoices arriving from the HST Zone that will automatically charge HST at the applicable provincial rate of the supplier because that will be the safe default position.  Communication will be important after the implementation of HST to correct these types of errors.  When in doubt regarding the application of HST, the purchaser may obtain an advance ruling from the GST/HST Directorate of the Canada Border Services Agency.

Finally, non-residents of Canada that purchase goods/property and/or services from Canadian businesses also need to have "The Chosen One".  Many Canadian businesses have adjusted their billing systems with the implementation of HST.  There will be situations where previously zero-rated supplies (GST charged at 0%) will default in the computer systems to 12%, 13% or 15% HST depending on the location of the supplier.  A quick call to the supplier to notify them of the change would be in order so that the computer errors can be corrected.

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The Toronto Post-G20 Clean Up and HST

As many businesses in Ontario know, there was damage in downtown Toronto that resulted from the actions of a few protesters during the week-end of July 26-27.  Here are a few tips about the pre- and post- harmonized sales tax (HST) world.

  • If a window is purchased in the pre-HST period at a retailer of glass, then goods and services tax (GST) and Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) will apply.
  • If a window is purchased on an installed basis during the pre-HST period, GST will apply, but ORST will not apply.  ORST will be incorporated into the cost of the installed window as it will be a cost of the supplier of the installed window.
  • If a window is purchased pre-HST or installed pre-HST, then the ORST cost (whether paid to the retailer or indirectly to the installer), the ORST is not recoverable.
  • If the window is purchased or installed post-HST (on or after July 1, 2010), then GST and HST would apply.
  • If a clean-up crew is hired to remove painted slogans in the pre-HST period, GST would apply, but ORST will not apply.
  • If a clean-up crew is hired to remove painted slogans in the post-HST period, GST and HST will  apply.
  • If the retailer is a store and engaged in commercial activities, they would be entitled to claim a full input tax credit to recover any GST/HST.
  • If the business is a bank, it is unlikely that the bank may claim an input tax credit and recover GST/HST paid to repair the damage.
  • If an insurance company enters into the contract with the window installer, it is unlikely that the insurance company will be entitled to recover the GST/HST because the sale of insurance policies is an exempt financial service. [Note: have the business buy the window and claim the in input tax credit]
  • If the Ontario provincial police buy a new car pre-HST, GST may not apply if the OPP are on the list of Ontario government departments (the federal government cannot charge tax of the provincial government).
  • If the Ontario provincial police buy a new police car post-HST, they must pay GST and HST.  The current rules do not provide rebates for provincial government departments.
  • If the Toronto police buy a new car pre-HST, they must pay GST and ORST, but would get a 100% rebate of the GST portion (not the ORST portion).
  • If the Toronto police buy a new car post-HST, they must pay GST and HST and will be entitled to claim the municipal PSB rebate to recover a large portion (not all) of the GST/HST paid.

I do not intend to suggest that businesses should wait. I am merely highlighting the different results caused by the tax reform.

We Now Have Place of Supply Regulations And More

In the June 9, 2010 Canada Gazette, the final HST place of supply regulations are published as SOR/2010-117 - now called "New Harmonized Value-added Tax System Regulations". Also included in the regulations are the HST anti-avoidance rules (Part 2), the HST transition rules (part 3), repeal of Place of Supply (GST/HST Regulations (Part 4) and application rules (Part 5).

It is about time that the nuts and bolts of the HST law is being made available to businesses in harmonized provinces. However, much is still missing, such as the real property rules and transition rules for builders of residential complexes. 

Graphic Designers in Ontario/BC Have HST Characterisation of Supply Questions

Graphic Designers have experienced Ontario retail sales tax issues for the last 4-5 years as auditors have taken the position that their services are actually "taxable services".  As a result of the confusion, the Association of Registered Graphic Designers (Ontario) consulted with the Ontario Ministry of Finance and prepared materials for members.  A number of charts/continuums were prepared by the Association to provide to the Ontario Ministry of Finance to demonstrate that there are many different types of graphic design services.  The Association's tools set out information for 8 categories of graphic designers (categories for the purposes of communication with Ontario):

  • exhibit graphic design
  • environmental/architecture graphic design
  • editorial graphic design
  • identity graphic design/branding
  • web design/new media
  • package graphic design
  • advertising graphic design
  • corporate communication/promotional material graphic design

After the creation of these documents, the Ontario Ministry of Revenue released RST Guide 520 "Graphic Designers", in which Ontario recognized and provided guidance regarding the Ontario retail sales tax consequences for various categories of graphic design services.

British Columbia issued SST Bulletin 128 for graphic designers in British Columbia (before the Ontario Guide).

With harmonized sales tax (HST), graphic designers will continue to have serious characterization issues.  The HST place of supply rules are based upon (divided into categories) based on the characterization of the supply.  FOR HST PURPOSES, THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT PLACE OF SUPPLY RULES THAT MAY APPLY FOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BASED ON WHAT TYPE OF GRAPHIC DESIGNER SERVICES/DELIVERABLES THEY PROVIDE.

Some graphic designers would apply the general HST place of supply rules for services.  Some graphic designers would apply the HST place of supply rules for services in respect of real property.  Some graphic designers would apply the HST place of supply rules for services in respect of tangible personal property. Some graphic designers would apply the HST place of supply rules for services in respect of photographic -related goods.  Some graphic designers would apply the HST place of supply rules for computer-related services.  Some graphic designers would apply the HST place of supply rules for intangible property. Some graphic designers would apply the HST place of supply rules for intangible property in respect of real property. Some graphic designers would apply the HST place of supply rules for intangible property in respect of tangible personal property. Some graphic designers may apply a combination of HST place of supply rules.

Any graphic designer in Ontario who does not charge the 13% HST rate in Ontario will have to justify not charging the 8% HST portion.  The same holds true for graphic designers in British Columbia if they do not charge the 7% HST portion.  Yes, both graphic designers in Ontario and British Colombia may compete with U.S.-based graphic designers who are not charging HST. That is another issue altogether. 

Graphic designers who sell only to businesses/clients/consumers in their province will not have place of supply issues as they will charge their provincial are on all invoices.  The graphic designers who have businesses/clients/consumers in more than one province will have to characterize their services/deliverables and apply the correct place of supply rule.  I would be pleased to help.

Canada Revenue Agency Reissues Revised Technical Information Bulletin 103 Regarding HST Place of Supply Rules

On June 3, 2010, the Canada Revenue Agency reissued a revised version of Technical Information Bulletin 103 "Place of Supply Rules for Determining Whether a Supply is Made in a Province".

This Technical Information Bulletin is 53 pages in length.  It has been updated to reflect changes to the HST place of supply rules in the draft regulations (drafted after the first release of the HST place of supply rules in February 2010). It contains 127 examples to assist businesses.  Some of the examples are helpful and others do not reflect common situations that businesses will experience.  That being said, the Canada Revenue Agency has released a document that all businesses should read as soon as possible.  If a business cannot find the answer in the Technical Information Bulletin, they should seek a ruling from the Canada Revenue Agency.

 

Consumer To Do List - HST is Coming

I want to share with you the list I made for myself to save HST:

  • book an appointment with Jie to save the HST on a hair cut (call beginning of June for late June appointment - also book summer highlights)
  • Late Spring Cleaning - take clothes to dry cleaners in June to save HST
  • Take dog to vet (save HST)
  • Call Electrician
  • Repair facets (save HST)
  • Arrange for Structural Engineer to take another set of readings (don't get me started on this one)
  • Ask husband to vacuum (okay, I am already saving the HST on this one).

What is on your list?

Tim Hudak Continues to Talk About HST Effects on Seniors and Others in Question Period

On June 1, 2010, Leader of the Opposition, Tim Hudak and Joyce Savoline, MPP continued to question the McGuinty Liberal Government about HST.  Their focus was senior citizens and condo owners.

Here are some of the excerpts from the questions and the answers (which, in my view, do not respond to the questions asked):

Question:

Mr. Tim Hudak: Back to the Acting Premier: Not only are people in the Yellow Shirt Brigade and other seniors across the province losing access to key ER services like in Fort Erie and Port Colborne, they're worried about the impact of the HST in one month's time. The HST greedy tax grab kicks in on Canada Day. Today marks the beginning of Seniors' Month, and how is Dalton McGuinty celebrating? Well, not in the Legislature today. He's interested in punishing seniors. The Premier is putting a new tax on mutual funds, which means less income in retirement. He's putting a new tax on condo fees, 8% on gas for their cars, snow removal, lawn care, home repairs, Internet, entertainment etc.

Why is the Premier closing down ER services and also raising the taxes on seniors in their retirement?

Hon. Kathleen O. Wynne: I know my colleague is going to want to comment on the HST.

I want to just make a comment, first of all, about what we have done for seniors, because the member opposite is saying that this government has not paid attention to the needs of seniors, and that is not true.

The most recent example that this party is not supportive of the initiatives we've put in place to help seniors is that they are in opposition to reducing the price of generic drugs. We are working very hard to make sure that seniors get the medications they need at a price that's reasonable, and the party opposite is not supportive of that.

On top of creating 8,000 new long-term-care beds, creating a new Ontario sales tax for seniors, doubling the Ontario home property tax for seniors, we have got a basket of measures to support seniors. The party opposite has not supported any one of those.

Question:

Mr. Tim Hudak: The minister asks what you've done to seniors. Well, Minister, you've closed the ERs for seniors in Niagara. You're bent on closing down community pharmacies and interrupting that dependent relationship between seniors and their community pharmacists. Now you're putting in smart meters that say to seniors, who have fought in the wars, who helped us through the Depression, who have built this great province, "Well, too bad. Wash your clothes at 11 p.m. Do your dishes at 10 p.m. We don't care."

The PC Party does not share that view, and we will continue to stand up and fight for seniors in this province.

What happens on Canada Day? A new tax on home heating, energy conservation retrofits, taking the dog or cat to the vet, cable, haircuts, vitamins. How much more can seniors take in Dalton McGuinty's Ontario? Won't the minister please stand up and say you're not going to go through with this massive tax-

Answer:

Hon. John Wilkinson: Millions of seniors and millions of Ontarians are going to receive billions of dollars over the next year courtesy of our agreement with the federal government. The PC Party voted against that. On July 1, seniors will receive their enhanced property tax credit. We're doubling that credit, a credit that you voted against in the first place, and you voted against the doubling. That is for seniors. And then there are many seniors who, in August, will start to qualify for the new Ontario HST rebate that your party voted against.

Let's make sure the seniors know the whole story on this file. Yes, indeed, we are reforming our tax system. This side of the House has a plan to create 600,000 more jobs in this province, and your side of the House doesn't. Seniors rely on their public services. It requires a vibrant economy, an economy like Ontario leading Canada and leading in the world-

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Tim Hudak and Lisa MacLeod Talk About HST Effects in Question Period

On Monday, May 31, 2010, Lisa MacLeod, MPP invited me to attend Question Period at the Ontario Legislature.  I had the opportunity to hear the questions being asked by the Leader of the Opposition, Tim Hudak and Lisa MacLeod, MPP and the Revenue Critic for the Progressive Conservative Caucus at Queen's Park and other Conservative MPPs (and Minister of Finance Dwight Duncan's responses)

Here are some excerpts of the exchanges (the heckling is cut out of this transcript):

Question:

Mr. Tim Hudak:  A question to the Acting Premier: As you know, Dalton McGuinty is going to force Ontario families to celebrate Canada Day with a massive new HST hike on everything. Families will also remember, as they're paying Dalton McGuinty's new greedy tax grab, that back in 2003 Dalton McGuinty was so eager to convince people he was not another tax-and-spend Liberal that he staged a photo op where he signed a promise not to raise taxes on families without their explicit consent, but then he increased taxes across the board anyway, including his massive health tax hike. I ask you, Acting Premier, why did Dalton McGuinty tell families something that he definitely is not?

Answer:
Hon. Dwight Duncan: This government has made strategic investments in health care and education and was re-elected in 2007 on the basis of those kinds of undertakings. Unlike the member opposite, we don't think the status quo is good enough. We are taking a tax change that will not raise taxes but overall will reduce taxes for some 93% of Ontarians. That's why Jack Mintz, that leader's expert witness at last year's budget hearings, says it's absolutely the best thing we could have done. That leader and his party supported it. That leader and his federal counterparts, Mr. Flaherty, Mr. Baird, Mr. Clement-all of them support this. They recognize, as that member used to recognize, that-
 

 

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My Latest HST (and Customs Duties) Presentation

Here is a copy of my latest PowerPoint presentation that I delivered on May 25, 2010 entitled "Let's Talk About HST and Customs Duties".  Yes, it is an odd combination of information.  The presentation was delivered in the context of supply chains involving Canada (Ontario in particular).  The focus was on non-income tax compliance.

Ontario Finally Lets Suppliers Know They Have To Start Charging HST

Is it a coincidence that today I had a discussion with an accountant who asked about whether a client must start charging GST and HST on July 1, 2010 (or starting on May 1, 2010 if the transition rules apply) and the Ontario Government comes out with Tax Information Notice 6 "HST Notice for Suppliers of Taxable Property and Services to the Ontario Government"?  Probably it was a coincidence.

Tax Information Notice 6 states:

Under the sales tax harmonization agreement between the Government of Ontario and the Government of Canada, the Canada-Ontario Comprehensive Integrated Tax Coordination Agreement (CITCA), Ontario has agreed that, effective July 1, 2010, all Ontario government ministries, agencies, boards, commissions and Crown corporations ("Ontario government entities") will pay Goods and Services Tax (GST) / Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) on their purchases of taxable property and services. Property could be goods, real property or intangible personal property such as trademarks, rights to use a patent, and digitized products downloaded from the Internet.

What this means is that existing contracts where suppliers do not charge goods and services tax (GST) and/or Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) may be subject to GST and HST after May 1, 2010.  It used to be that Ontario Government ministries, departments and crown corporations told suppliers that they are GST-exempt.  This was not the correct term: the Ontario Government ministries, departments and crown corporations were not exempt under a provision of the GST legislation (a.k.a, the Excise Tax Act (Canada)).  The correct term is that the supplies were not taxable (but were not in the non-taxable importations schedule to the GST Legislation).  In simple terms, the federal government could not request that the provincial government pay tax and entered into a reciprocal taxation agreement.

Tax Information Notice 6 goes on to state:

Ontario government entities that are currently paying GST, as well as those that are currently claiming an exemption from GST (i.e., ministries and other provincial entities listed on Schedule A of the current Canada-Ontario Reciprocal Taxation Agreement (RTA) – see Appendix for list of entities, will pay GST/HST on their purchases of taxable property and services effective July 1, 2010. (Emphasis added)

Suppliers to the Ontario Government need to revisit existing contracts and change their invoicing and record keeping.  More importantly, the suppliers may need to educate their Ontario Government clietns/customers that they need to pay GST and HST. Information Notice 6 contains a warning not to be fooled by Ontario Government clients/customers:

Accordingly, suppliers must generally charge and collect GST/HST on any consideration that becomes due on or after July 1, 2010 in respect of a taxable supply to an Ontario government entity. In these cases, suppliers should not rely on or accept any Crown funds exemption requests or certifications requesting GST/HST relief at the point-of-sale.

Can you imagine the conversation between suppliers and their Ontario Government customers/clients where the Ontario Government customers/clients say they do not have to pay the GST/HST and the supplier must "respectfully disagree"?

I have to warn you about the May 1, 2010 - June 30, 2010 period.  The Ontario Government is telling suppliers in Information Notice 6 that if they currently have to pay GST (because they are not in Appendix A), they have to continue to pay GST.  If they currently are not required to pay GST (because the client/customer is listed in Appendix A), they do not have to pay GST during the May 1, 2010 to June 30, 2010 transition period (but will after July 1, 2010).  If they have to pay HST during the May 1, 2010 to June 30, 2010 transition period (and Appendix A does not apply when one talks about OHST), they must pay such OHST. Thanks for clearing up that up! 

Some suppliers who are not currently registered for GST purposes (because they only make non-taxable supplies to the Ontario Government) will have to get registered for GST/HST purposes.  Some suppliers who are not collecting and GST will have to adjust their record keeping to charge GST and HST on invoices and record such collections in their accounting records.  In addition, such businesses who have not been claiming input tax credits will need to record input tax credits in accounting records in connection with purchases.  Large businesses may be affected by the restricted input tax credits rules and cannot claim all OHST paid on business inputs. Some suppliers will need to file GST/HST returns electronically and be in a position to retrieve information from accounting records with respect to GST/HST collected, GST/HST invoiced and collectible, and input tax credits on purchased inputs. There is a lot more suppliers to the Ontario Government need to do to prepare for HST.

One last word of warning is that suppliers to the Ontario Government should prepare to be audited after implementation of HST.  They will be "low hanging fruit" for Canada Revenue Agency auditor as some will be making mistakes.  These changes are big changes.

Real Estate Agents Have A Good HST Question

I have been contacted by an old friend (an Ottawa lawyer that I know and respect from my days at Goodmans LLP) who asked whether residential real estate commissions are subject to harmonized sales tax (HST) if the fees are in respect to activities performed by a real estate agent before July 1, 2010 and where the agreement of purchase of sale was signed before July 1, 2010, but the actual transfer of the residential real estate to the purchaser(s) occurred after July 1, 2010.  Obviously, the real estate at issue is located in Ontario.

What was explained to me was that all or substantially all of the real estate agent's services are performed prior to the conclusion of an agreement of purchase and sale by the vendor and purchaser.  Based on my personal experience buying a new home and selling an old home is that most of the services of the real estate agent are provided before the agreement is signed.  The vendor's real estate agent makes the house or condominium unit pretty and takes pictures.  Then they make a promotional brochure.  Then they advertise the property.  Then they take appointments for showings and sometimes attend the showings.  They sometimes host open houses.  The vendor's agent works to bring together a group of persons who would be interested in the property and often aims to create the environment of a bidding war between potential buyers.  The vendor's real estate agent then receives the offer(s) to purchase and forwards the offer(s) to the homeowners.  The negotiation process proceeds and eventually the vendor accept an offer an the paperwork is drawn up and signed.  Very little in the way of services is required from the vendor's real estate agent after the agreement of purchase and sale is signed and sent to the lawyers.

The purchaser's real estate agent performs services of identifying properties that meet the purchaser's requirements, setting up appointments with other agents for listed properties and takes the purchasers to the various appointments.  These services can take place over a number of months.  Eventually the perfect property is located and the purchaser's agent assists the purchaser in arranging financing and drafting an offer.  The purchaser's agent assists the purchaser with the negotiation of the deal and the final step is the agreement of purchase and sale.  It is possible that the offer/negotiation stage may transpire on many homes until the purchaser concludes a contract with a vendor.  In my experience, the purchaser's agent may also assist the purchaser find a lawyer and an inspector. Very little in the way of services is required from the purchaser's real estate agent after the agreement of purchase and sale is signed and sent to the lawyers.

That being said, after the date the agreement of purchase and sale is signed, there may be conditions in the agreement that must be satisfied (e.g. arranging financing, a home inspection, selling an existing home, etc.) before the contract is perfected. As a result, the important date is either the date of signing the agreement of purchase and sale or the date that the conditions are satisfied or expire. 

The question is whether under the transition rules, the real estate agent must charge HST.  The transition rule for services is that HST would generally apply to the supply of a service to the extent that the service is performed on or after July 1, 2010.  HST would generally not apply to a supply of a service if all or substantially all (90 per cent or more) of the service is performed before July 2010.  Consideration due or paid on or after July 1, 2010 would be subject to HST to the extent that  the consideration is for the part of a service that is performed on or after July 1, 2010 (See Ontario Ministry of Revenue Information Notice #3 "General Transition Rules for Ontario HST")

Based on the transition rules:

1) With respect to residential real estate deals signed before July 1, 2010 and all conditions are satisfied before July 1, 2010, it should be that HST is not payable if all or substantially all of the real estate agent's services are performed before July 1, 2010.  If the agreement of purchase and sale is signed and the conditions expire before July 1, 2010, it should be that all or substantially all of the services are considered to be performed before July 2010 and, therefore HST should not be payable. 

That being said, it would be useful for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to issue an administrative statement that they agree with the timing of the services.  I cannot imagine what basis the CRA would give that 10% or more of the services are performed after the satisfaction of all conditions.

Real estate agents should help themselves by taking detailed records of when they performed services for clients so that they can do the math for the auditors.

2) With respect to residential real estate deals that are signed before July 1, 2010 and some of the conditions expire after July 1, 2010, the facts and the HST status of the supply will have to be considered on a case-by-case basis.  It is possible that more than 10% of the services will be performed after July 1, 2010 if the conditions create particular complications or if the buyer picked the first home they saw and the real estate agent's time was required to keep a deal together.

3) With respect to residential real estate deals that are signed before July 1, 2010 and fall apart after July 1, 2010, the facts and HST status of the supply will have to be considered on a case-by-case basis with respect to amounts received by real estate agents from the deposits.

Landlords Not Happy about HST and are Asking Tenants to Leave

One of the benefits of The HST Blog is that I receive information from followers and can share their real life stories about living with harmonized sales tax (HST) and the negative effects of HST.

I have received an email from a follower, B, about her mother being asked to leave a rented condominium unit by a landlord.  B has informed (and I have changed a few details to protect B [look for brackets]):

My mother has rented a condo for the last 3 1/2 years in [Ontario]. She does not have a lease but merely an agreement with the landlord to pay monthly [rent]. The landlord showed up for the rent check on Sat May 1, 2010. At that time he informed her that [the landlord's] family would be moving into the condo and he gave her a brief letter and he signed it. He gave her 2 months notice that she has to be out by (coincidentally) June 30, 2010.

I have heard that landlords can only increase rent by a certain percent (2.1% ?) but this is how some landlords can get around that. I started looking for some rentals in [Ontario] online as soon as my mother informed me about this [meeting with her landlord]. I did phone one person that was advertising a sublease for 3 months for $1100.00 per month. He informed me that after the sublease the rent was being increased to $1270.00 per month.

What this real life story tells us is that HST is affecting the decisions of landlords and negatively impacting tenants (already).  Rentals of residential real property are not subject to Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) or British Columbia social services tax (BCSST). Rentals of residential real property are exempt for goods and services tax (GST)/HST purposes. This means that landlords are not entitled to claim input tax credits and cannot recover GST/HST paid on purchases.  HST (and GST) would be payable on landlord's costs such as electricity, heating fuel, landscaping, snow removal, repairs, management fees (paid to third parties), security, supply and install fixtures (carpets, paint, cabinets, etc.), etc.

As a result, if a landlord's costs of operating the property increase due to HST, then the landlord will want to pass those increased costs on to the tenants.  However, the landlords may not be able to pass on the costs to existing tenants (under the landlord-tenant laws).  Some landlords are asking the existing tenants to leave so that they may charge new tenants a higher amount of rent.  Under the law, landlords are limited in the reasons for asking a tenant to leave.  One of the acceptable reasons for asking a tenant to leave is that the landlord is moving into the residential real property unit.

What we are learning is that HST may result in homelessness of individuals as landlords ask tenants to leave.  HST is negatively affecting some seniors on fixed incomes who have been asked to leave their rented homes.  It may not be easy for individuals to find new affordable housing.  In addition, moving ones possessions requires friends/family or a moving company (which costs money).

What we might see is landlords increasing rents and tenants having to accept the higher costs (if they can afford the higher rent) even if the rent increase is contrary to the law.

These negative effects cannot be solved by a one-time cheque.

An HST Calculator - What a Useful Tool!

The British Columbia New Democrats have posted an HST calculator and so has the Ottawa Citizen.   I think that this is a good idea and allows individuals to calculate what the implementation of a harmonized sales tax (HST) will mean to their family.  This very useful tool may be used by families in British Columbia and Ontario.

The areas covered by the HST calculators are:

  • gas for automobiles
  • electricity
  • natural gas/heating oil
  • home renovations/repairs
  • Internet services
  • Children's sports activities
  • air, train and inter-city bus fees
  • professional fees (lawyers, accountants, real estate, etc.)
  • landscaping/snowplowing
  • membership fees (gym, golf, tennis, yoga, pilates, etc.)
  • veterinary care
  • green fees/lift tickets
  • haircuts/manicures/spa
  • restaurant meals/takeout
  • tax preparation services
  • movie/theater tickets
  • newspapers/magazines
  • taxi fare
  • home telephone and cable
  • dry cleaning
  • bicycles
  • other

It is important to note that newspapers will be subject to a point of sale rebate in Ontario and certain telephone and telecommunications services and restaurant meals were subject to Ontario retail sales tax (ORST).  It is also important to note that lawyers services are subject to British Columbia social service tax (BCSST).

In order to expand the list of items, it is important to remember that provincial sales tax is payable on most goods (unless an exemption exists) and a limited number of services (has to be in the definition of "taxable service").  As a general rule, provincial sales tax is not payable on real property and intangible property.

In order to calculate what HST will mean to your family budget, you will need to focus on items that were not subject to provincial sales tax and, after July 1, 2010, will be subject to HST.

A good starting point is your invoices/bills for the January - April 2010 period.  Take the invoices out of the files, drawers, purses, wallets and wherever else they may be.  Look at the invoices to see what was subject to goods and services tax (GST), but not provincial sales tax.  Make a list of these items and the amounts you paid.

Then cross off that list any items that will be subject to a point of sale exemption (books, newspapers, prepared food under $4.00, children's clothing, etc.)

Then add to the list expenditures that occur in the year that did not happen in January - April (e.g., a vacation, travel for Christmas or Thanksgiving holidays, summer theater tickets, propane for the barbeque, landscaping, renovations, etc.)  If you need to look at a short list of items that were previously not subject to ORST and will be subject to HST, go to the recently released Ontario Government publication on what is taxable and what is not taxable.

After undertaking this exercise using the HST calculator, how mush over/under the Statistics Canada average of $792 per family per year?  We are searching for a copy of the Statistics Canada report and are currently are relying on new reports of its existence.

Canada's Department of Finance Has Released Draft HST Place of Supply Rules Regulations

On April 30, 2010, Canada's Department of Finance released "Draft Regulations in respect of the Place of Supply of Property and Services".  Section 33 states that the Place of Supply (GST/HST) Regulations are to be repealed and replaced by the Regulations in respect of the Place of Supply of Property and Services.  Even though these regulations have been released in draft form, the will apply to supplies made (a) on or after May 1, 2010 and (b) after February 25, 2010 and before May 1, 2010 unless any part of the consideration for the supply becomes due or is paid before May 1, 2010.

It is very important to note that the place of supply rules have changed slightly in certain cases.  For example. the place of supply rules for services in connection with litigation have changed from:

February 25, 2010 version: "A supply of a service rendered in connection with criminal. civil or administrative litigation in a particular province will be regarded as being made in that province.

to:

April 30, 2010 version: A supply of a service rendered in connection with criminal, civil or administrative litigation (other than a service rendered before the commencement of such litigation) that is under the jurisdiction of a court or other tribunal established under the laws of a province or in the nature of an appeal from a decision of a court of other tribunal established under the laws of a province, is made in that province.

The HST Blog raised concerns about the draft place of supply rule for litigation services and may have influenced the change.

There are other changes to the draft regulations that will be discussed in future blog posts. Please note that draft regulations trump administrative announcements.

What is a "Service" for GST/HST Purposes?

The harmonized sales tax (HST) transition rules and HST place of supply rules set out general and specific rules for tangible personal property, real property, intangible property and services.  What is important and glaringly missing is guidance on how the Canada Revenue Agency divides up the categories.

Subsection 123(1) of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) defines "service" to mean:

"anything other than
(a) property,
(b) money, and
(c) anything that is supplied to an employer by a person who is or agrees to become an employee of the employer in the course of or in relation to the office or employment of that person"

This means that the catch-all basket is the services basket.  It also means that you must determine if the supply at issue fits in another basket and whether it is property, money or supplied in the context of an employer-employee relationship.

I will focus on the more difficult concept - property. Subsection 123(1) of the Excise Tax Act (Canada) defines "property" to mean:

"any property, whether real or personal, movable or immovable, tangible or intangible, corporeal or incorporeal, and includes a right or interest of any kind, a share and a chose in action, but does not include money."

"Personal property" is defined to mean "property that is not real property".  So, you must ask if the supply is real property.

"Real property" is defined to include:
 

(a) in respect of property in the Province of Quebec, immovable property and every lease thereof,
(b) in respect of property in any other place in Canada, messuages, lands and tenements of every nature and description and every estate or interest in real property, whether legal or equitable, and
(c) a mobile home, a floating home and any leasehold or proprietary interest therein;

 
If the supply does not fit within this "real property" definition, you must ask if the supply is "tangible personal property or intangible property.  However, the terms "tangible personal property" and "intangible personal property" are not defined in the Excise Tax Act.  That being said, there is significant case law on the subject(s).
 
In short, if you can determine that the supply is not real property, not property, not money and not supplied in connection with an employer-employee relationship, the rules relating to services would apply.

The various publications by the Canada Revenue Agency, Department of Finance and Ontario/BC contain examples in connection with the transition rules.  This helps if certain situations fall between the lines or in the grey area.  In my 16 years of practice I have seen many grey areas and have seen auditors move supplies from one basket to another.  I expect this practice to continue.

If your situation falls between the lines in the grey area, please seek the advice of a specialist.  For example, the Canada Revenue Agency is going to have difficulties with computer programs.  Over-the-shelf software will likely be considered to be tangible personal property.  Custom computer software may be considered to be tangible if provided on a disk/CD-Rom or a service if custom or intangible personal property if the contract sets out license rights.  Whether a computer software maintenance contract is a contract for services or intangible property is an open question that the Canada Revenue Agency is considering.  If it is possible that no maintenance would be required in a given period, the Canada Revenue Agency may consider the contract to be in respect of intangible personal property.  The same issue arises for warranties and help desk contracts.

Vendors in Ontario and BC Face Audit Risk If Fail To Follow HST Transition Rules

Many businesses in Ontario and British Columbia are not prepared for harmonized sales tax (HST) transition, which starts on May 1, 2010.  Yes, July 1, 2010 is the official implementation date for HST.  However, the transition rules require businesses that deliver property and/or render services after (or lease goods beyond) July 1, 2010 to collect and remit HST with respect to consideration paid after May 1, 2010.  In other words, any contracts entered into after May 1, 2010 where consideration is paid after May 1, 2010 for property delivered or leased or services rendered after July 1, 2010 would be subject to HST.  The two key facts to remember for the HST transition rules at issue are (1) delivery/provision/rental after July 1, 2010 and (2) payment received after May 1, 2010.

It is not clear why the Governments decided to implement this transition rule - except the concern that consumers and exempt businesses would somehow circumvent HST in the months of May and June 2010.

In the end, it is businesses that are most at risk.  If a vendor makes a mistake and fails to charge HST, they may be audited and assessed a penalty for failure to collect HST.  When this happens, the HST is an unrecoverable cost to the business (unless the business can pursue the consumer).

If you consider goods, this is where the vendor may get hit hard.  The vendor of goods would likely collect both GST and Ontario retail sales tax (ORST) (unless the goods are exempt from ORST) in May or June because most goods are subject to ORST.  However, a Canada Revenue Agency auditor can come along and reassess the vendor for HST if the transition rules apply.

For example, if a vendor enters into a contract to sell a $200,000 motor home on May 15, 2010 and receives payment in full, he/she may collect GST in the amount of $10,000 and mistakenly collect ORST in the amount of $16,000.  If the motor home is delivered in August 2010 (because it needed to be manufactured), the vendor should have collected HST and not ORST.  If the vendor remits the GST to the Receiver General of Canada and the ORST to the Minister of Finance in Ontario, a Canada Revenue Agency auditor may assess the vendor for failure to collect and remit HST (or may even take the position that the ORST was actually HST and that the vendor collected and did not remit HST).  The vendor may be assessed the $16,000 and interest and a penalty for making a mistake.  This mistake could require the vendor to pay over $20,000 depending on when the audit occurs (taking into account interest and penalties).

If more than one mistake is made between May 1, 2010 and July 1, 2010, the amounts could really add up.

The HST transition rules are flawed.  The vendor may face a catch-22 situation.  If the vendor promises to deliver the motor home on June 25, 2010 and collects the $200,000 on May 15, 2010, the vendor would believe the $16,000 is ORST.  The vendor must remit the ORST with its May ORST return that is due on June 23, 2010.  If the motor home is not available by June 30, 2010 and the motor home is delivered after July 1, 2010, the HST transition rules would turn the ORST into HST.  Under the HST transition rules, the vendor would be required to remit the HST with it GST/HST return for July 2010, which is due on August 30, 2010.  In other words, the vendor is required to keep the HST a little bit longer and remit the amount to the Receiver General of Canada instead of the Minister of Finance.

It will be easy for an auditor to come along in 2012 and say what a vendor should have done in the circumstances.  The auditor may not be sympathetic to the fact that the vendor did collect the right amount of sales taxes and that the Government of Ontario actually was not out any money.

Where the Government of Ontario would be out money is with respect previously non-taxable services and previously exempt goods.  With respect to the ORST exempt goods, Ontario taxation policy effectively changes on May 1, 2010 (e.g., custom computer software, bicycles, manufacturing and production equipment, etc.).

With respect to services, this is really the focus of the HST transition rules,  Here are some links to articles I have written that may help service providers:

 

Ontario Issues Publication on What is Subject to HST and What is Not

Ontario has posted a good/help (not entirely complete) publication "What's Taxable Under the HST and What's Not?".  It is a good first attempt at communicating with the public at large about what property and services will be subject to HST.

Broad categories that are broken down into sub-items are:

  • clothing and footwear;
  • food and beverages;
  • home services;
  • accommodation and travel;
  • around the house;
  • motorized vehicles;
  • home purchases;
  • health products and services;
  • memberships, entertainments and sports equipment;
  • leases and rentals;
  • electronics;
  • professional and personal services;
  • tobacco; and
  • banking and investments.

There document has been prepared more as a self-promotion piece than anything else.  as a result, it does not emphasize the multitude of services, real property and intangible property that will be subject to higher rate taxation.

That being said, a document such as this is needed and useful.

The Federation of Rental-Housing Providers of Ontario Come Out Swinging

After I posted my blog posting yesterday, I was sent the Federation of Rental Housing Providers of Ontario issued a press release entitled "McGuinty Government Dupes Media and Tenants on HST: Tenants not protected from HST". The press release states:

Today the McGuinty Liberal government misled the media and tenants and caused further harm to rental housing quality by announcing that landlords will not be able to pass on HST costs to tenants in above guideline rent increases (AGIs).

“This bizarre move by the Liberal government was designed to capture headlines and dupe the media into believing that tenants are somehow going to be protected from negative HST impacts” said Vince Brescia, President & CEO of FRPO. 

The government gave deliberately misleading information in its press release designed to capture media attention, and also designed to attack landlords rather than help them deal with the huge negative consequences of the HST that are specific to the rental housing industry.

“It is unfortunate that the government has chosen not to help the industry deal with the massive negative impact of the HST on Ontario’s rental stock and tenants” said Brescia. “They seem to be more interested in headlines than in helping tenants”.

This is an interesting press release that goes on to provide more detailed information about the rental housing industry in Ontario and their point of view that harmonized sales tax (HST) costs to landlords will be passed on to renters in the form of higher rents.  It is particularly interesting in light of the fact that HST implementation is only 2.5 months away.  It is also interesting in light of the wage freeze budget.

The tone of the news release is more provocative than what is usual. But, provocation may be necessary.  Many in Ontario can be described as happy sleeping puppies who are not aware of what HST will mean starting on July 1, 2010. If there is misinformation by government officials, then in is n important public service for those who understand what is myth and what is true to come forward.

I will continue to monitor this situation in order to report further on whether landlords will be restricted n their ability to pass on unrecoverable HST costs to tenants/renters of residential real property.  I would expect that landlords would be entitled to pass on unrecoverable HST costs in the form of higher rents.  It will be a significant development if laws and regulations are passed to limit landlords' recovery rights. 

If laws and regulations are passed in relation to one industry, it is a slippery slope to force on businesses unrecoverable HST costs.  The initial announcements at the time of the announcement of HST was that the tax reform was beneficial to business.  The residential rental property industry may disagree at this time.

Ontario Renters Hear Good News About Government Limits on HST Recovery Rent Increases

The Toronto Star is reporting that the Ontario Liberal Government plans to make a big announcement  to help out renters of real property by restrictions on rent increases.  On the other hand, the announcement restricts the ability of landlords to raise rents to recover unrecoverable harmonized sales tax (HST).

Laurie Monsebraaten reports:

In advance of the harmonized sales tax taking effect in July, sources say the Liberal government will close a loophole in rent regulations that would have allowed landlords to apply for above-guideline rent increases based on the new 13 per cent tax on utilities.

Instead, the new HST costs for utilities will be reflected in rent only as they affect the Consumer Price Index, which the province uses to calculate the annual rent increase guideline. 

Continue Reading...

Proposed HST Place of Supply Rule For Real Property Is Relatively Straight-Forward

On February 25, 2010, Canada's Department of Finance released its proposed harmonized sales tax (HST) place of supply rules which will be used to determine whether a supplier (Seller) must charge, collect and remit HST in connection with a supply made in Canada and whether a recipient (Buyer) must pay HST in connection with an acquisition or importation and at what rate. Simply put, the proposed HST place of supply rules will be used to determine in which province a supply is considered to have occurred for HST purposes.

The proposed place of supply rule for real property is relatively straight-forward. With respect to the place of supply rule for real property, the Department of Finance did not make any changes to the current rule applicable in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, & Newfoundland and Labrador.

A supply of real property will be considered to be made in the province in which the real property is situated. If the real property being supplied is located in British Columbia, HST will be applicable at the rate of 12%. If the real property being supplied is located in Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick or Newfoundland and Labrador, HST will be applicable at the rate of 13%. If the real property being supplied is located in Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta or one of the three territories, HST will not be applicable. However, GST would be applicable at the rate of 5%.

The Department of Finance provides the following example:

    A sale of a warehouse situated in Sarnia, Ontario will be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component).

Some other examples would be:

  • A sale of timber lands situated in British Columbia will be subject to HST at a rate of 12 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 7 per cent British Columbia component).
  • A sale of vacant land situated in Goderich, Ontario will be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component).
  • A sale of a resource property (the land component) in Alberta, will not be subject to HST, but will be subject to GST.

In addition, the supply of an interest in real property is considered to be a supply of real property and the HST place of supply rules for real property would apply. For example, an option to purchase real property would be considered to be real property. If a recipient pays an amount for the right to purchase a leased factory in 10 years, the payment would subject to HST if the factory is located in the HST Zone (British Columbia, Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick or Newfoundland and Labrador.

The lease of real property is also considered to be a supply of real property. For example, a lease of office space in Toronto, Ontario will be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component).

If a company in Ontario leases a commercial office building in British Columbia, the supply of real property will be considered to be made in British Columbia. As a result, HST would be imposed at a rate of 12 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 7 per cent British Columbia component) despite the fact the company is incorporated under the laws of Ontario. The key fact is that the real property that is being leased is located in British Columbia.

There will be situations where a person owns real property in more than one Canadian province and transfers all or some of its assets to another person. For example, a large Canadian company with real property assets in Ontario and Quebec sells all of the assets of its business. In this case, it is proposed that the place of supply rules will deem there to have been separate supplies of real property in Ontario and Quebec. The transfer of the real property located in Ontario would be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component). The transfer of the real property located in Quebec would be subject to GST at a rate of 5 per cent and would not be subject to HST (would be subject to QST).

Conversely, a payment made to break a real property lease would be considered to be a supply of real property and would be subject to HST if the real property is located in the HST Zone.