Canadian Sales Tax Rates (as at October 1, 2016)

Canadian Sales Tax Rates Chart
As at October 1, 2016

 

Province/Territory Provincial Sales Tax GST/HST Rate GST Included in PST Tax Base Combined Rate
British Columbia 7% 5% N/A 12%
Alberta Nil 5% N/A 5%
Saskatchewan 5% 5% No 10%
Manitoba 8% 5% No 13%
Ontario N/A 13% N/A 13%
Quebec 9.975% 5% N/A 14.975%
New Brunswick N/A 15% N/A 15%
Nova Scotia N/A 15% N/A 15%
Newfoundland/Labrador N/A 15% N/A 15%
Prince Edward Island N/A 15% Yes 15%
Northwest Territories Nil 5% N/A 5%
Yukon Nil 5% N/A 5%
Nunavut Nil 5% N/A 5%

The HST rate for Newfoundland/Labrador increased to 15% from 13% effective July 1, 2016.

The HST rate for New Brunswick increased to 15% from 13% effective July 1, 2016.

The HST rate for Prince Edward Island increased to 15% effective October 1, 2016.

The ITC recapture rate in Ontario decreased to 50% as of July 1, 2016.

Steps To Take

  1. Are you charging the correct amount of sales tax?
    • Sales departments/accounts receivable departments that have programmed HST-included pricing will need to update the sales tax rates in their systems.
    • Even companies that calculate sales tax separately will need to make sure that computer programs have been updated.
  2. Are you paying the correct amount of sales tax?
    • Payroll departments will need to review invoices in the months following the sales tax increases to ensure that they are being charged the correct amount of sales tax.
    • This means not paying the higher rate for property and services provided before July 1, 2016 and paying the higher rate, if applicable, after July 1, 2016.
  3. Are you claiming the correct amount of ITCs?
    • The finance department will need to make sure that computerized programs that break out the amount of HST payable on invoices have been updated to reflect the higher HST rates.
  4. Are Ontario businesses not giving too much back?
    • The ITC recapture rate in Ontario has decreased to 50% from 75%.  This means the amount of ITCs that companies can claim may have increased for some large businesses.
    • Have you updated your computerized records to reduce the recapture rate?

For more information, please contact Cyndee Todgham Cherniak at 416-307-4168 or at cyndee@lexsage.com. Alternatively, visit www.lexsage.com.

Taxpayer Interest And Penalty Relief: How Can A Taxpayer Get Some Relief?

Canadian taxpayers are entitled to apply to the Canada Revenue Agency for taxpayer relief of penalties and interest.  All that is required is for a taxpayer who has been assessed to complete and submit an RC4288 form "Request for Taxpayer Relief - Cancel or Waive Penalties and Interest".  This form can be used for goods and services tax ("GST") and harmonized sales tax ("HST") relief in addition to income tax.

The form is relatively simple - however, the devil is in the details.  Section 2 is very important and any taxpayer seeking a significant amount of relief should take care in writing the reasons for the request for relief.  We often prepare a separate document providing the facts and reasons why relief should be granted - we do not limit the written communication to the form.  We also attach relevant documents to show transparency and openness.

It is important to understand that relief is not guaranteed.  While the CRA has broad discretion to grant relief, they also have broad discretion to deny relief. The CRA provides limited information about when they will grant penalty and interest relief.  The CRA indicates that the Minister of National Revenue may grant relief from penalty or interest when the following types of situations prevent a taxpayer from meeting their tax obligations:

  • extraordinary circumstances:  Penalties or interest may be cancelled or waived in whole or in part when they result from circumstances beyond a taxpayer's control. Extraordinary circumstances that may have prevented a taxpayer from making a payment when due, filing a return on time, or otherwise complying with a tax obligation include, but are not limited to, the following examples:
    • natural or human-made disasters, such as a flood or fire;
    • civil disturbances or disruptions in services, such as a postal strike;
    • serious illness or accident; and
    • serious emotional or mental distress, such as death in the immediate family;
  • actions of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA): The CRA may also cancel or waive penalties or interest when they result primarily from CRA actions, including:
    • processing delays that result in taxpayers not being informed, within a reasonable time, that an amount was owing;
    • errors in CRA material which led a taxpayer to file a return or make a payment based on incorrect information;
    • incorrect information provided to a taxpayer by the CRA;
    • errors in processing;
    • delays in providing information, resulting in taxpayers not being able to meet their tax obligations in a timely manner; and
    • undue delays in resolving an objection or an appeal, or in completing an audit;
  • inability to pay or financial hardship:  The CRA may, in circumstances where there is a confirmed inability to pay amounts owing, consider waiving or cancelling interest in whole or in part to enable taxpayers to pay their account. For example, this could occur when:
    • a collection has been suspended because of an inability to pay caused by the loss of employment and the taxpayer is experiencing financial hardship;
    • a taxpayer is unable to conclude a payment arrangement because the interest charges represent a significant portion of the payments; or
    • payment of the accumulated interest would cause a prolonged inability to provide basic necessities (financial hardship) such as food, medical help, transportation, or shelter; consideration may be given to cancelling all or part of the total accumulated interest; and
  • other circumstances: The CRA may also grant relief if a taxpayer's circumstances do not fall within the situations described above.

The CRA is working to improve its procedures for dealing with Requests for Taxpayer Relief. When a completed form is filed with the supporting documentation, the CRA should send a letter to the requester acknowledging receipt of the Request for Taxpayer Relief.  The file should be assigned to a CRA officer and the taxpayer should receive requests for relevant documentation (unless a full set of relevant documents is provided with the Request for Taxpayer Relief).

If the taxpayer gets a decision that is not favourable - it happens often - then there is the ability to request an impartial review of the CRA officer's decision by the CRA (not the same CRA officer who rejected the request).

If the review procedure ends in a rejection of the requested relief, it is possible to seek a review by the Federal Court of Appeal by way of a judicial review.  However, judicial reviews often are an expensive legal procedure and can cost tens of thousands of dollars (even hundreds of thousands of dollars in some cases depending on the complexity of the issues). There have been judicial review applications filed and the Federal Court of Appeal has in some cases sided with the taxpayer.

I will be honest with you - the Request for Taxpayer Relief Program can be frustrating for persons seeking relief. That does not mean it is not worth the effort and one should not try. Just know that you may feel like you are still stuck in the mud while pursuing a process that may take time.

For more information, please contact Cyndee Todgham Cherniak at 416-307-4168 or at cyndee@lexsage.com.  We have many useful articles about tax audits under Free Information - Sales Tax, Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) and Goods and Services Tax (GST) Articles.

15 Stages Of A Canada Revenue Agency GST/HST Audit

If you have never been audited before, you probably have no idea what to expect.  Most audits follow the same 15 stages (more or less).  On the taxpayer's side of things, each stage is stressful.

  1. CRA Selection Process:  The taxpayer usually has no involvement in this process.  It all happens behind the scenes and the taxpayer can only guess why their name was selected. Sometimes the taxpayer is randomly selected.  Sometimes the taxpayer is selected as a result of the industry segment in which they operate.  Sometimes the taxpayer is selected because of something in a filing with the CRA.  Sometimes the taxpayer is selected because of a tip made to the CRA.
  2. The Audit Letter: The taxpayer receives a letter from the CRA notifying them that they are to be audited. Normally, the taxpayer is asked to contact the CRA auditor.  However, sometimes the auditor just shows up at the business premises.
  3. The CRA letter requesting certain documents:  Usually the CRA auditor will send to the taxpayer a letter indicating what documents need to be provided before the initial meeting at the taxpayer's premises or what documents must be available for the first day of the audit.
  4. Initial Meeting:  If the audit occurs at the taxpayer's premises, the auditor will have a meeting at the start of the audit.  The auditor explains what is expected during the audit.  The taxpayer should also communicate to the auditor what is expected.  The taxpayer may indicate that the auditor must deal with a specific person so that the entire organization does not end up working for the auditor.
  5. Fieldwork:  The on-site audit is the fieldwork stage.  The fieldwork can take place over a few days or over a lengthy period of time.
  6. Office work: Usually the auditor will take information back to the CRA offices and work on the audit from the CRA premises.
  7. Follow-up questions: It is common for the CRA auditor to contact the taxpayer after the fieldwork stage of the audit. Sometimes additional documents are requested.  Sometimes additional questions are asked.
  8. Preliminary Report: The CRA auditor will prepare a proposal and send it to the taxpayer for comment.  Usually a proposed assessment number is provided to the taxpayer.
  9. Response Letter: The taxpayer has an opportunity to change the minds of the CRA.  This is the best opportunity to stop an incorrect assessment from being issued.
  10. Notice of Re-assessment: The CRA auditor sends to the taxpayer the Notice of Reassessment setting out how much is being assessed.
  11. CRA Collections: As of the date of the Notice of Re-assessment, a debt is due to Her Majesty.  CRA Collections may start collection activities immediately after the Notice of Re-Assessment is issued.
  12. Notice of Objection: If a taxpayer disagrees with a Notice of Re-Assessment, the taxpayer can file a Notice of Objection.
  13. Objection: The taxpayer will communicate with a CRA Appeals Officer and the re-assessment will either be confirmed, amended to reversed.
  14. Notice of Appeal: Assuming that not all the issues are addressed in the objection stage, a taxpayer may file an appeal with the Tax Court of Canada.
  15. Day in Tax Court: A taxpayer will have their day(s) in the Tax Court of Canada if the appeal is not settled.  A Tax Court judge will listen to the parties and render a judgement.

For more information, please contact Cyndee Todgham Cherniak at 416-307-4168 or at cyndee@lexsage.com.  We have many useful articles about tax audits under Free Information - Sales Tax, Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) and Goods and Services Tax (GST) Articles.

Canadian Sales Tax Rates (as at January 1, 2016)

Canadian Sales Tax Rates Chart
As at January 1, 2016

 

Province/Territory

Provincial Sales Tax

GST/HST Rate

GST Included in PST Tax Base

Combined Rate

British Columbia

7%
 

5%
 

N/A

12%

Alberta

Nil

5%

N/A

5%

Saskatchewan

5%

5%

No

10%

Manitoba

8%

5%

No

13%

Ontario

N/A

13%

N/A

13%

Quebec

9.975%

5%

N/A

14.975%

New Brunswick

N/A

13%

N/A

13%

Nova Scotia

N/A

15%

N/A

15%

Newfoundland/Labrador

N/A

13%

N/A

13%

Prince Edward Island

9%

5%

Yes

14%

Northwest Territories

Nil

5%

N/A

5%

Yukon

Nil

5%

N/A

5%

Nunavut

Nil

5%

N/A

5%



 

While Notices of Objection May Be A "DIY" Procedure, You Must Follow The Law

The Excise Tax Act (Canada) has been drafted to allow taxpayers who have been assessed GST/HST to file a notice of objection.  There is nothing in Section 301 of the Excise Tax Act that requires a taxpayer to hire a professional to assist with the filing of a notice of objection.  For this reason, I call it a "Do-It-Yourself" procedure.

However, there have been times when the taxpayer does not follow the instructions in the legislation (usually because the taxpayer did not obtain a copy of the legislative provisions, did not know where to obtain  the legislative provisions or did not understand the legislative provisions). When a taxpayer does not file a notice of objection in the prescribed form and providing the required information, the Tax Court may not be able to help the taxpayer overturn the assessment.

I can help with showing you where to find the prescribed form.  Use a GST Form 189 to file a Notice of Objection. Check to see if the form has been updated (I can post a form, but after my post the document can change).

I can help you find the instructions. GST Memorandum 31 "Objections and Appeals" contains useful information.

Subsection 301(1) of the Excise Tax Act requires:

Any person who has been assessed and who objects to the assessment may, within ninety days after the day notice of the assessment is sent to the person, file with the Minister a notice of objection in the prescribed form and manner setting out the reasons for the objection and all relevant facts.

What this means is that a taxpayer has 90 days to file the notice of objection.  Please put this date in your calendar and circle it is red.  Also, put a reminder in your calendar a few weeks before the deadline to make sure you have the notice of objection on the front burner and under control.

The law requires that the taxpayer set out the reasons for the objection and all relevant facts.  You cannot merely send a letter stating that you object to the CRA's assessment.

If the taxpayer is a "specified person", the amount of information and detail required by subsection 301(1.1) of the Excise Tax Act is greater.

In a number of cases, the Tax Court has determined that taxpayers have not filed a valid notice of objection.  One of those cases was an income tax case - 870 Holdings Ltd. v Her Majesty the Queen, .  In this case the taxpayer wrote a letter to the CRA requesting more time to provide requested information.  This letter did not constitute a notice of objection. The Federal Court of Appeal agreed - 2003 FCA 460.

In Suganthi Natarajan v. Her Majesty the Queen, the Tax Court also determined it court not hear an appeal because a valid notice of objection.

The notice of objection is am important document in the tax dispute settlement process.  it is the first step in resolving a disagreement with the CRA. The taxpayer files it with the tax authorities and eventually either the taxpayer of the Crown provides a copy to the Tax Court of Canada.  While the Tax Court of Canada understands that the "DIY" appellant may not be perfect in all that they write, the judge needs to see that the taxpayer took the appropriate steps.  It the document is well written, it may leave a positive impression.

At LexSage, we would be please to assist.  Please call 416-307-4168.

B.C. NDP Party Hopes to Prevent Passage of HST Legislation

The British Columbia Times Colonist newspaper is reporting that the New Democratic Party (NDP) in British Columbia is planning to use any means available to prevent the passage of Bill 9 - 2010 "The Consumption Tax Rebate and Transition Act" that was tabled in the British Columbia Legislature on March 30, 2010. That being said, the fist vote relating to the Bill passed 47 to 34 due to the number of seats held by Premier Campbell's Liberal Government. So, while the NDP's plans to stop the unpopular HST legislation should be welcomed by the electorate, they should not expect to be saved from HST.

The report indicates that the NDP leader, Carole James, plans to use legislature procedures to have a debate. The NDP plan to table amendments to Bill 9-2010 and take their allotted speaking time in the Legislature. The hope is at least a one month delay,

The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, lead by Tim Hudak, tried unsuccessfully to delay the passage of the Ontario version of the HST legislation using similar legislative mechanisms.  However, Bill - 218  Ontario Plan for More Jobs and growth Act, 2009" passed in Ontario in December 9, 2009.

The unfortunate reality is that HST is going to be a reality soon - very soon.  The late passage of legislation in British Columbia will not help businesses prepare.  In fact, if the delay tactics successfully take a month or more, HST collection obligations may have already kicked in -- as of May 1, 2010.  Businesses must collect HST on supplies of property and/or services if:

(1) the contract is entered into after April 30, 2010

(2) the property and/or services are to be delivered after July 1, 2010, and

(3) consideration is paid after May 1, 2010

It is also unfortunate that the place of supply rules have been released in administrative statement format only (as of April 1, 2010).  The regulations have not been promulgated by the Federal Government.  As a result, as of April 1, 2010, businesses do not have sufficient information to ensure they are ready as of May 1, 2010 or even July 1, 2010.  Something that should be discussed is a period of leniency by the Canada Revenue Agency regarding enforcement.

Changes to Wash Transaction Rules Coming Soon

happy faceThe Canada Revenue Agency is close to releasing a revised wash transaction policy for goods and services tax (GST) and harmonized sales tax (HST).   A "wash transaction" occurs when a supply that is taxable at 5% or 12% or 13% is made and the supplier has not remitted an amount of net tax by virtue of not having correctly charged and collected the tax from the recipient who is a registrant who would have been entitled to claim a full input tax credit (ITC) if the tax had been correctly applied.  In other words, the supplier makes an error in not charging the correct amount of GST/HST when the recipient is entitled to a full input tax credit.  As a result, the Government of Canada is not deprived of tax revenues as a result of the error.

The old wash transaction policy in GST Memorandum 16-3-1 "Reduction of Penalty and Interest in Wash Transaction Situations" granted a concession to suppliers.  The CRA did not collect interest, but did impose a 4% wash penalty.

This 4% penalty may be gone under the new policy.  Please stay tuned for what we are told is good news.

Would You Like To Play Audit Roulette In Ontario?

Last week at the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants Commodity Tax Symposium West in Calgary, a representative of Ontario stated to the audience that Ontario planned to conduct retail sales tax audits of most businesses in the next two years.

Pursuant to the Retail Sales Tax Act (Ontario), the normal audit period is four years. The audit period may be extended where there has been a misrepresentation attributable to neglect, carelessness or wilful default.

This is important to know because after the implementation of the harmonized sales tax (HST) on July 1, 2010, the Ontario Government will want to make sure that it has received all the retail sales tax required under the law as it was prior to HST. Just because we are moving to the HST, retail sales tax liabilities will continue. Auditors will continue to visit businesses (some would say plague businesses - but that is not very nice).

Businesses are now playing audit roulette. Will the auditor find the retail sales tax problems/mistakes that the business has been ignoring?

Businesses have three primary choices:

1. Continue to play audit roulette by continuing to ignore legacy retail sales tax problems;

2. Conduct an internal audit or control audit with a sales tax lawyer, accountant or consultant, identify the existing problems, and make a voluntary disclosure to report the mistakes to the Ministry of Revenue (come clean so to speak); and

3. Conduct an internal audit or control audit with a sales tax lawyer, accountant or consultant, identify the existing problems/mistakes and improved the processes and retroactively solve the problems to reduce exposure. For example, if a business sells goods that will be incorporated into goods for resale or will be resold by the purchaser, the business may ensure its purchase exemption certificates are in order. Another example would be that if a business should have collected tax on a transaction, they may send an invoice to the customer and remit the tax to the Ontario Government. Another example would be that if a business imported goods and failed to report and pay retail sales tax in respect of the importation, they may do so before an auditor knows on the door.

In addition, vendors and customers should communicate with each other about audits as the Minister is not entitled to impose a penalty on a vendor who failed to collect tax and assess the buyer for failure to pay tax on the same transaction --- the Minister cannot receive the same tax from both parties.

Audits take up the human resources of company officials and interfere with the operation of the business. Proactive steps by a business does save money, time and aggravation.

Harmonized Sales Tax's Restricted Input Tax Credits Rules Means Not 100% Recovery For All Ontario Businesses

The Ontario government will harmonize the provincial retail sales tax (RST) with the federal goods and services tax (GST) on July 1st, 2010. One of the benefits being discussed in certain circles as a reason to support harmonization is that  Ontario businesses will receive input tax credits (ITCs) and recover harmonized sales tax (HST) and GST paid on business purchases. They say business will essentially be able to recover the 13% paid on business purchases, including the HST component paid on previously non-taxable and exempt purchases for RST purposes.

However, this is not quite correct.  Not all businesses in Ontario will benefit immediately to the tune of 13% ITCs. Specifically, businesses with annual taxable supplies greater than $10 million (including corporate groups and related companies), as well as certain financial institutions, municipalities, charities, universities, colleges and schools, hospitals, nursing homes, etc., will be restricted from claiming ITCs for the provincial portion (currently 8 per cent) of the HST, until 2015.

The restricted ITCs are on a few business inputs, such as certain uses of energy; certain telecommunications services; certain road vehicles and their fuel; and food, beverages and entertainment. The ITCs restrictions will be in place for the first five years of the HST, after which ITCs on the exempt items will be phased out over the following three year period.

Ontario has released an Information Notice on Restricted Input Tax Credits to provide additional information to businesses.

Sales Tax Tip: Ask to Include the Auditor's Manager in Discussions

First, I should say, DO NOT CALL WOLF. Asking to include to the auditor's manager or the senior manager at a meeting with you (the vendor or taxpayer) and the auditor should be used in limited (but greater than occasional) circumstances. If you ask for a meeting, the general rule is that a meeting must be arranged.

In this blog post, I focus on Ontario retail sales tax. However, the concept also applies to goods and services tax (GST).

I have asked for a meeting with the auditor's manager or senior manager when there is a fundamental disagreement of the applicability to a taxing provision to a client's situation. I have asked for a meeting when the auditor does not appear to understand the facts (often the facts are complex) and I feel that the auditor is going to raise an assessment incorrectly. I ask for a meeting with the auditor's manager when there is a serious personality conflict between my client and the auditor (it has happened) and I feel that the auditor may be biased and intent on punishing my client.

I do not ask to speak to the auditor's manager to intimidate the auditor - it does not work. I do not ask to speak to the auditor's manager regarding little issues. I do not ask to speak to the auditor's manager on the first day of the audit. I do not ask to speak to the auditor's manager when my client is clearly in the wrong.

In Ontario, if a retail sales tax assessment is issued, then the auditor's job is complete and the only recourse a vendor or taxpayer has is to file a notice of objection. It currently takes over 2 years for a notice of objection to be reviewed by the Ontario Ministry of Revenue Tax Appeals Branch. Usually, the tax assessment must be paid within 18 months and interest continues to accrue. For this reason, I feel it is my role to make sure the auditor gets the assessment correct.

If I receive an audit summary (which is a summary of the auditor's findings), which usually precedes the actual assessment, I ask for the reasons for the assessment. When there is a disagreement over the law or an interpretation of the law, an administrative statement or a court decision, I ask to speak to the auditor's manager, who usually has more discretion and more experience. Sometimes I for the auditor to write Tax Advisory for a ruling and that I will help with the facts so that the answer received is more likely to be correct (does not always happen that way).

There is a fine line between being assertive and aggressive, proactive and reactive. That being said, recently, managers have agreed with me (when I have known that i am correct) and some assessments have been reduced (1) Case 1: from over $1 million to close to $0, (2) Case 2: from approximately $500,000 to about $25,000 and (3) Case 3: by over $300,000. These results obviously depended on the particular circumstances of the file.

New GST/HST Electronic Filing Requirements Announced

To little fanfare and no media attention, on January 4, 2010, The Honourable Jean-Pierre Blackburn, Minister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture and Agri-Food) announced proposed changes to electronic filing requirements for goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) registrants beginning July 1, 2010.

The reason for the electronic filing requirements is that the Canada Revenue Agency needs to gather information so that the Department of Finance can communicate information to Ontario and British Columbia pursuant to the CITCAs (a.k.a. HST Agreements).

Currently, only GST/HST registrants who meet the criteria set by the Minister of National Revenue have the option to use electronic filing. As a result of the proposed changes, restrictions will be removed so that all registrants, including those registrants that file a return with Revenu Québec, will be able to file electronically.

Under the new proposed measures, the following groups will be required to file their GST/HST returns electronically:

  • GST/HST registrants with greater than $1.5 million in annual taxable supplies (except for charities); or
  • all registrants required to recapture input tax credits for the provincial portion of the HST on certain inputs in Ontario or British Columbia; or
  • builders affected by the transitional housing measures announced by Ontario or British Columbia.

In general, charities and most GST/HST registrants with annual taxable supplies of $1.5 million or less will not be affected by these changes, although the CRA is encouraging all GST/HST registrants, regardless of their filing frequency and reporting requirements, to use electronic services.

Regulations specifying the persons and classes of persons who will be required to file an electronic return will be available soon (government has been prorogued).

The CRA will offer several electronic filing options for GST/HST registrants. However, many registrants will not have an option and will be forced to use a particular electronic filing method.

  • GST/HST NETFILE
    • Netfile is a free Internet-based filing service that allows registrants to file their returns directly to the CRA over the Internet. To file using GST/HST NETFILE, registrants complete an online form, enter the required information and confirm that they want to file their return. Once the registrant hits <submit></submit></submit><//submit>a confirmation page will immediately be displayed containing the six-digit confirmation number.
    • It is proposed that the following GST/HST registrants would be required to file an electronic return using GST/HST NETFILE effective for the first reporting period that ends on or after July 1, 2010:
    • any registrants that are required to recapture ITCs on the provincial portion of the HST on certain inputs in Ontario or British Columbia (see below); and
    • builders that
      • make sales of grandparented housing where the purchaser is not entitled to claim a GST/HST new housing rebate or new residential rental property rebate;
      • make sales of housing that are subject to the HST where the builder purchased the housing on a grandparented basis;
      • are required to report a transitional tax adjustment amount; or
      • report provincial transitional new housing rebates (see below).
    • In conjunction with these proposed new filing requirements, the CRA will include new information fields on the GST/HST NETFILE return for these registrants.

  • GST/HST TELEFILE
    • Telefile allows eligible registrants to file their GST/HST returns using their touch-tone telephone and a toll-free number.
    • It is also proposed that each builder having greater than $1.5 million in annual taxable supplies that is not otherwise required to file using GST/HST NETFILE and that pays or credits a GST/HST new housing rebate amount to the purchaser and claims that amount as a deduction from the builder’s GST/HST liability would be required to file an electronic return using GST/HST NETFILE or GST/HST TELEFILE effective for the first reporting period that ends on or after July 1, 2010.

    • As a result of the proposed changes, the CRA will include new information fields on the GST/HST NETFILE and GST/HST TELEFILE returns for these registrants.

  • Electronic Data Interchange (EDI)
    • EDI is a computer-to-computer exchange of information in a standard format. Eligible registrants can use EDI to file their GST/HST returns and remit their GST/HST payments electronically.
  • GST/HST Internet File Transfer (GIFT)
    • GIFT is a new option that allows eligible registrants to utilize third-party CRA certified accounting software to file their returns electronically.
    • It is also proposed that all GST/HST registrants, other than those required to file using GST/HST NETFILE or GST/HST TELEFILE and with greater than $1.5 million in annual taxable supplies, excluding charities, would be required to file an electronic return using GST/HST NETFILE, GST/HST TELEFILE, EDI or GIFT effective for the first reporting period that ends on or after July 1, 2010.

The CRA provides the following chart:

 

 

Type of Business Filing Options

Businesses that:
a) are required to recapture ITCs for the provincial portion of the HST on certain inputs in Ontario or British Columbia; or
b) are builders who sell grandparented housing where the purchaser is not entitled to claim a GST/HST new housing rebate or new residential rental property rebate; or
c) are builders who sell housing subject to the HST where the builder purchased that housing on a grandparented basis; or
d) are builders who are required to remit the transitional tax adjustment on housing; or
e) are builders who are reporting provincial transitional new housing rebates.

GST/HST NETFILE

Unless required to file using GST/HST NETFILE, builders with greater than $1.5 million in annual taxable supplies that pay or credit a GST/HST new housing rebate amount to the purchaser and claim that amount as a deduction from their GST/HST liability.

GST/HST NETFILE
GST/HST TELEFILE

Businesses that are not required to file using GST/HST NETFILE or GST/HST TELEFILE and with annual taxable supplies exceeding $1.5 million, excluding charities.

GST/HST NETFILE
GST/HST TELEFILE
GIFT
EDI

All other businesses.

GST/HST NETFILE
GST/HST TELEFILE
GIFT
EDI
Paper Return

The businesses that I have spoken with suggest that there are complications that need to be considered.  It is necessary to communicate with the Canada Revenue Agency if there are any problems so that notes can be made in your file and accommodations can be discussed.

Preparing for Harmonized Sales Tax

The current plans are that Ontario and British Columbia will harmonize their provincial sales taxes ("PST") with the goods and services tax ("GST") on July 1, 2010. Whether you support the idea of harmonized sales tax ("HST") or not, all businesses must prepare for the sales tax reform or risk costly errors in the future.

In preparing for the HST, there is a very long list of questions that should be asked. The following list is only the "tip of the iceberg":

1.      Has your business changed the general ledger ("GL") accounts for your 2010 taxation year to reflect change on July 1, 2010? Since HST will be implemented on July 1, 2010, any business that does not have a June 30th year end will need to ensure that the accounting records have the additional GL accounts so that PST is recorded pre-July 1, 2010, HST is recorded post-July 1, 2010 and that the tax base of depreciable capital costs include PST pre-July 1, 2010 and do not record recoverable costs post July 1, 2010. There are a number of other adjustments that will be required.

2.      Has your business adjusted its record-keeping to track restricted input tax credits? The Ontario and British Columbia HST proposals included the announcement that between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2012, large businesses (businesses making over $10 million in taxable sales) will not be entitled to receive any input tax credits ("ITCs") (that is, recover HST paid) on purchases of:

  • (a)    Energy (except where purchased by farms and for use in producing goods for sale;

  • (b)   Telecommunication services (other than internet access and toll-free numbers);

  • (c)    Certain automobiles and road vehicles; and

  • (d)   Meals and entertainment expenses.

The time period for full restrictions on ITCs may be extended. The current plans are for the restrictions to be phased out between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2015. As a result of the restrictions on the HST component, large businesses and any business that may become a large business (that is, may exceed the $10 million taxable sales threshold in an affected taxation year) should record the GST component and HST component separately in their books and records for these expense items.

3.      Has your business considered whether HST will affect cash flows and budgets? Many businesses have not yet considered whether payment of HST on commercial rent, electricity, production equipment and machinery, management fees, legal fees, accounting fees, temporary placement, rights to use intellectual property, etc. will affect their cash flow. Businesses that file GST/HST annually, quarterly or even monthly may have to address cash flow issues that will arise due to the upfront payment of GST/HST to suppliers and the delay before claiming permissible input tax credits.

4.      Has your business considered when the HST rules will start to affect your business decisions and activities? On October 14, 2009, the Ontario and British Columbia governments released publications outlining the transition rules for transactions that occur after October 14, 2009. The underlying purpose of the transition rules is to ensure that the provinces receive HST after July 1, 2010, even if arrangements were made prior to that date.

Type of Supply

Consideration Due or paid after July 1, 2010

Consideration Due or paid between May 1, 2010 and July 1, 2010

Consideration Due or paid between October 14, 2009 and July 1, 2010 (Category A Businesses)

Sales of Tangible Personal Property

HST applies

HST applies – registered vendors should begin collecting

HST applies re certain businesses required to self assess

Leases and Licenses Tangible Personal Property

HST Applies

HST applies – registered vendors should begin collecting

HST applies re certain businesses required to self assess

Services

HST Applies

HST applies – registered vendors should begin collecting

HST applies re certain businesses required to self assess

Sales of  real property (not residential)

HST Applies

NO HST

NO HST

Sales intangible property

HST Applies

NO HST

NO HST

Type of Imported Supply

Consideration Due or paid after July 1, 2010

Consideration Due or paid between May 1, 2010 and July 1, 2010

Consideration Due or paid between October 14, 2009 and July 1, 2010

Imported TPP (crosses border into Ontario/BC after July 1, 2010

HST applies

HST applies

HST applies re certain businesses required to self assess

Imported Services for consumption, use or supply in ON or BC to extent service performed a/f July 1, 2010

HST Applies

HST applies

HST applies re certain businesses required to self assess

Imported IPP for consumption, use or supply in ON or BC to extent IPP leased, licenses a/f July 1, 2010

HST Applies

HST applies

HST applies re certain businesses required to self assess

(There are many complex transition rules but these are not set in this abridged article. See the editor's note below. Indeed, there are a number of industry-specific transition rules relating to prepaid funeral and cemetery services, subscriptions to newspapers, magazines and periodicals, passenger transportation services, freight transportation services, commercial parking passes, memberships in clubs, organizations and associations, admissions to places of amusement, direct sellers, continuous supplies, real property construction, combined supplies, progress payments, holdbacks, etc.)

5.      Has your business undertaken a review of each existing contract to determine whether HST is going to be applicable? This question needs to be asked if your business is the vendor/supplier or the purchaser/recipient. If a business does not undertake this exercise, the business will be exposed to audit risk.

6.      Are there any changes required to your business' public statements on web-sites, quotation sheets, contracts, etc.?  Does your business communicate to customers/clients which sales taxes you will be charging or whether certain sales taxes are included in quoted prices? Do you sell to persons who may not be familiar with the proposed HST changes and who may challenge the charges at a late date in court? Do you sell to municipalities that will not be entitled to receive 100% of the HST by way of a public sector rebate? Do you sell to businesses and charities which are not able to recover the entire HST component? In short, the manner in which your business communicates information may expose your business to litigation risk with third parties.

7.      Are there any improvements that should be made to your documentation to ensure that you have the evidence necessary to justify non-collection of HST on export sales of goods and services that occurred outside Ontario or British Columbia? If a business does not charge, collect and remit the correct percentage of GST/HST (13% for Ontario and 12% for British Columbia), then a Canda Revenue Agency ("CRA") auditor may ask for evidence to justify a decision. If a business exports goods, the auditor may require proof of exportation and all shipping documents, including import documentation from the foreign jurisdiction. If the destination is another Canadian province, proof of delivery to that jurisdiction will likely be required. Contracts and invoices should indicate the place of delivery clearly. Since it is difficult to document the place of delivery of services and intangible property, questions should be asked concerning what documentation may be recorded and maintained. For example, a service provider may be required to present dockets on time spent outside Ontario or British Columbia performing services, hotel receipts, travel tickets, etc. 

8.      Has your business educated the accounting staff about the HST changes and trained the staff on recording information on incoming and outgoing invoices to account for the HST component? The CRA auditors require the business to review each and every invoice to ensure the GST/HST is correct. If a business fails to detect errors by suppliers, the recipient may be assessed unpaid GST/HST, penalties and interest. In addition, if an incoming invoice from a supplier does not satisfy the documentary requirements for claiming ITC's, an auditor may deny the credits.

9.      Has your business implemented codes of conduct or internal policies relating to sales taxes and income taxes in Canada that must be updated? If your business does not have internal controls, should internal checks & balances be established?

10.  Has your business considered whether the change to HST creates any opportunities to save money?

As mentioned, this list of questions is not definitive, but points to the scope of matters to be considered in preparing for harmonization.